Navigation Links
Nanoscale whiskers from sea creatures could grow human muscle tissue
Date:3/11/2011

Nanoscale whiskers from sea creatures could grow human muscle tissue

Minute whiskers of nanoscale dimensions taken from sea creatures could hold the key to creating working human muscle tissue, University of Manchester researchers have discovered.

Scientists have found that cellulose from tunicates, commonly known as sea squirts, can influence the behaviour of skeletal muscle cells in the laboratory.

These nanostructures are several thousand times smaller than muscle cells and are the smallest physical feature found to cause cell alignment.

Alignment is important since a lot of tissue in the body, including muscle, contains aligned fibres which give it strength and stiffness.

Cellulose is a polysaccharide a long chain of sugars joined together usually found in plants and is the main component of paper and certain textiles such as cotton.

It is already being used for a number of different medical applications, including wound dressings, but this is the first time it has been proposed for creating skeletal muscle tissue.

Tunicates grow on rocks and man-made structures in coastal waters around the world.

Cellulose extracted from tunicates is particularly well suited for making muscle tissue due to its unique properties.

University of Manchester academics Dr Stephen Eichhorn and Dr Julie Gough, working with PhD student James Dugan, chemically extract the cellulose in the form of nanowhiskers. One nanometre is one billionth of a metre and these minute whiskers are only 10s of nanometres wide far thinner than a human hair.

When aligned and parallel to each other, they cause rapid muscle cell alignment and fusion.

The method is both simple and relatively quick, which could lead to doctors and scientists having the ability to create the normal aligned architecture of skeletal muscle tissue.

This tissue could be used to help repair existing muscle or even grow muscle from scratch.

Creating artificial tissue which can be used to replace damaged or diseased human muscles could revolutionise healthcare, and be of huge benefit to millions of people all over the world.

Dr Eichhorn thinks the cellulose extracted from the creatures could lead to a significant medical advancement. He added: "Although it is quite a detailed chemical process, the potential applications are very interesting.

"Cellulose is being looked at very closely around the world because of its unique properties, and because it is a renewable resource, but this is the first time that it has been used for skeletal muscle tissue engineering applications.

"There is potential for muscle precision engineering, but also for other architecturally aligned structures such as ligaments and nerves."

PhD student James Dugan has become the first UK student to win the American Chemical Society's Cellulose and Renewable Material Division award for his work on nanowhiskers.


'/>"/>

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
0044-161-275-8387
University of Manchester
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Boston College receives W.M. Keck Foundation funding for nanoscale optical microscope
2. Columbia University researchers use nanoscale transistors to study single-molecule interactions
3. Structural distortions emerge from nothing at the nanoscale
4. Nanoscale probe reveals interactions between surfaces and single molecules
5. Pitt-led team develops nanoscale light sensor compatible with Etch-a-Sketch nanoelectronic platform
6. Electron billiards in nanoscale circuits
7. ORNL scientists reveal battery behavior at the nanoscale
8. NASA funds development of nanoscale materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries
9. Nanoscale DNA sequencing could spur revolution in personal health care
10. High definition diagnostic ultrasonics on the nanoscale
11. New nanoscale transistors allow sensitive probing inside cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/28/2017)... 28, 2017 Summary This report ... Biochem and its partnering interests and activities since 2010. ... an in-depth insight into the partnering activity of one of ... company reports are prepared upon purchase to ensure inclusion of ... The report will be delivered in PDF format within ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... March 28, 2017  The National Pharmaceutical Council (NPC) ... health policy research organization as its newest member. ... Affairs ( North America ), will serve ... "We,re pleased to have Ipsen and Dr. ... Dan Leonard . "We welcome their insights in helping ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... -- Biostage, Inc. (Nasdaq: BSTG), ("Biostage" or ... to treat cancers and other life-threatening conditions of the ... McGorry, CEO of Biostage, will present on the ... MassBio 2017 Annual Meeting on Thursday, March ... The 3D Printing and BioEngineering panel will ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... Focus is on the ... to the scientifically intensive operations of companies in ... and industrial. In today,s pre-market research, Stock-Callers.com dedicates attention ... PTLA), OvaScience Inc. (NASDAQ: OVAS), Ocera Therapeutics Inc. ... OCUL ). Learn more about these stocks ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:2/21/2017)... LONDON , February 21, 2017 ... um 70 Millionen US-Dollar wachsen. Nach einem Gespräch mit mehr ... es einige Hindernisse zu überwinden gilt, um diese Prognose ... ... unter anderem die Mobilisierung der finanziellen Mittel für die ...
(Date:2/14/2017)... -- Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center today announced Julie Ann Freischlag, ... (CEO). Freischlag joins the medical center on May 1 ... who last year announced that he would transition to ... it since 2008.   As CEO, Freischlag ... academic health system, which includes Wake Forest School of ...
(Date:2/13/2017)... -- Former 9/11 Commission border counsel and Special Counsel ... of Identity Strategy Partners, LLP, today releases the ... Order: Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into ... President Trump,s ,Travel Ban, Executive Order gains more notoriety ... travel ban, it is important that our national discourse ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):