Navigation Links
Nanoscale DNA sequencing could spur revolution in personal health care
Date:8/16/2010

In experiments with potentially broad health care implications, a research team led by a University of Washington physicist has devised a method that works at a very small scale to sequence DNA quickly and relatively inexpensively.

That could open the door for more effective individualized medicine, for example providing blueprints of genetic predispositions for specific conditions and diseases such as cancer, diabetes or addiction.

"The hope is that in 10 years people will have all their DNA sequenced, and this will lead to personalized, predictive medicine," said Jens Gundlach, a UW physics professor and lead author of a paper describing the new technique published the week of Aug. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The technique creates a DNA reader that combines biology and nanotechnology using a nanopore taken from Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A. The nanopore has an opening 1 billionth of a meter in size, just large enough to measure a single strand of DNA as it passes through.

The scientists placed the pore in a membrane surrounded by potassium-chloride solution. A small voltage was applied to create an ion current flowing through the nanopore, and the current's electrical signature changed depending on the nucleotides traveling through the nanopore. Each of the nucleotides that are the essence of DNA cytosine, guanine, adenine and thymine produced a distinctive signature.

The team had to solve two major problems. One was to create a short and narrow opening just large enough to allow a single strand of DNA to pass through the nanopore and for only a single DNA molecule to be in the opening at any time. Michael Niederweis at the University of Alabama at Birmingham modified the M. smegmatis bacterium to produce a suitable pore.

The second problem, Gundlach said, was that the nucleotides flowed through the nanopore at a rate of one every millionth of a second, far too fast to sort out the signal from each DNA molecule. To compensate, the researchers attached a section of double-stranded DNA between each nucleotide they wanted to measure. The second strand would briefly catch on the edge of the nanopore, halting the flow of DNA long enough for the single nucleotide to be held within the nanopore DNA reader. After a few milliseconds, the double-stranded section would separate and the DNA flow continued until another double strand was encountered, allowing the next nucleotide to be read.

The delay, though measured in thousandths of a second, is long enough to read the electrical signals from the target nucleotides, Gundlach said.

"We can practically read the DNA sequence from an oscilloscope trace," he said.

Besides Gundlach and Niederweiss, other authors are Ian Derrington, Tom Butler, Elizabeth Manrao and Marcus Collins of the UW; and Mikhail Pavlenok at Alabama-Birmingham.

The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health and its National Human Genome Research Institute as part of a program to create technology to sequence a human genome for $1,000 or less. That program began in 2004, when it cost on the order of $10 million to sequence a human-sized genome.

The new research is a major step toward achieving DNA sequencing at a cost of $1,000 or less.

"Our experiments outline a novel and fundamentally very simple sequencing technology that we hope can now be expanded into a mechanized process," Gundlach said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. High definition diagnostic ultrasonics on the nanoscale
2. New nanoscale transistors allow sensitive probing inside cells
3. Researchers develop ultra-simple method for creating nanoscale gold coatings
4. Superconductors on the nanoscale
5. Penn material scientists turn light into electrical current using a golden nanoscale system
6. Small optical force can budge nanoscale objects
7. LANL Roadrunner simulates nanoscale material failure
8. New material for nanoscale computer chips
9. Breaking barriers with nanoscale lasers
10. Graphene may have advantages over copper for IC interconnects at the nanoscale
11. New rotors could help develop nanoscale generators
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Any expert in stem ... compromised these disciplines for more than half a century. Despite their essential roles ... It is widely known that molecular tags developed for this purpose also tag other, ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Coffea arabica accounts ... and abiotic factors. During this educational webinar, participants will learn about the importance ... gain a better understanding of how genomics is important for coffee breeding improvement. ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... Oregon (PRWEB) , ... August 14, 2017 , ... ... that provide essential device-to-computer interconnect using USB or PCI Express, announced the release ... , SYZYGY is intended to satisfy the need for a compact, low cost, ...
(Date:8/11/2017)... Antonio, Texas (PRWEB) , ... August 11, 2017 , ... ... a rebranding campaign this month that will incorporate important key elements including a new ... thank the community that has supported them, Bill Miller has partnered with the South ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:6/14/2017)... PARIS , June 15, 2017  IBM (NYSE: IBM ... the international tech event dedicated to developing collaboration between startups ... on June 15-17. During the event, nine startups will ... deliver value in various industries. ... in the international market, with a 30 percent increase in ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , April 24, 2017 ... and partner with  Identity Strategy Partners, LLP (IdSP) ... "With or without President Trump,s March 6, 2017 ... Terrorist Entry , refugee vetting can be instilled with ... resettlement. (Right now, all refugee applications are suspended ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... , April 13, 2017 According to a new ... Authentication, Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, ... IAM Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 ... (CAGR) of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):