Navigation Links
NIST electromechanical circuit sets record beating microscopic 'drum'
Date:3/9/2011

BOULDER, Colo.Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated an electromechanical circuit in which microwaves communicate with a vibrating mechanical component 1,000 times more vigorously than ever achieved before in similar experiments. The microscopic apparatus is a new tool for processing information and potentially could control the motion of a relatively large object at the smallest possible, or quantum, scale.

Described in the March 10 issue of Nature,* the NIST experiments created strong interactions between microwave light oscillating 7.5 billion times per second and a "micro drum" vibrating at radio frequencies 11 million times per second. Compared to previously reported experiments combining microscopic machines and electromagnetic radiation, the rate of energy exchange in the NIST devicethe "coupling" that reflects the strength of the connectionis much stronger, the mechanical vibrations last longer, and the apparatus is much easier to make.

Similar in appearance to an Irish percussion instrument called a bodhrn, the NIST drum is a round aluminum membrane 100 nanometers thick and 15 micrometers wide, lightweight and flexible enough to vibrate freely yet larger and heavier than the nanowires typically used in similar experiments.

"The drum is so much larger than nanowires physically that you can make this coupling strength go through the roof," says first author John Teufel, a NIST research affiliate who designed the drum. "The drum hits a perfect compromise where it's still microscale but you can couple to it strongly."

The NIST experiments shifted the microwave energy by 56 megahertz (MHz, or million cycles per second) per nanometer of drum motion, 1,000 times more than the previous state of the art.

"We turned up the rate at which these two things talk to each other," Teufel says.

The drum is incorporated into a superconducting cavity cooled to 40 milliKelvin, a temperature at which aluminum allows electric current to flow without resistancea quantum property. Scientists apply microwaves to the cavity. Then, by applying a drive tone set at the difference between the frequencies of the microwave radiation particles (photons) and the drum, researchers dramatically increase the overall coupling strength to make the two systems communicate faster than their energy dissipates. The microwaves can be used to measure and control the drum vibrations, and vice versa. The drum motion will persist for hundreds of microseconds, according to the paper, a relatively long time in the fast-paced quantum world.

In engineering terms, the drum acts as a capacitora device that holds electric charge. Its capacitance, or ability to hold charge, depends on the position of the drum about 50 nanometers above an aluminum electrode. When the drum vibrates, the capacitance changes and the mechanical motion modulates the properties of the electrical circuit. The same principle is at work with a microphone and FM radio, but here the natural drum motion, mostly at one frequency, is transmitted to the listener in the lab.

The experiment is a step towards entanglementa curious quantum state linking the properties of objects between the microwave photons and the drum motion, Teufel says. The apparatus has the high coupling strength and low energy losses needed to generate entanglement, he says. Further experiments will address whether the mechanical drumbeats obey the rules of quantum mechanics, which govern the behavior of light and atoms.

The drum is a key achievement in NIST's effort to develop components for superconducting quantum computers and quantum simulations, while also working toward the widely sought scientific goal of making the most precise measurements possible of mechanical motion.

Quantum computers, if they can be built, could solve certain problems that are intractable today. The microwave and radiofrequency signals in the new electromechanical circuit could be used to represent quantum information. NIST scientists plan to combine the new circuit with superconducting quantum bits to create and manipulate motion of relatively large objects on the smallest (quantum) scales.

The experiment reported in Nature is a prelude to cooling the drum to its "ground state," or lowest-energy state. Starting from the ground state, the drum could be manipulated for the applications mentioned above. In addition, such control would enable tests of the boundary between the everyday classical and quantum worlds. The drum also has possible practical applications such as measuring length and force with sensitivities at levels of attometers (billionths of a billionth of a meter) and attonewtons (billionths of a billionth of a newton), respectively.

As a non-regulatory agency, NIST promotes U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology technology :

1. Using new materials to make more reliable nanoelectromechanical systems
2. Clemson researchers advance nanoscale electromechanical sensors
3. Clemson researchers advance nanoscale electromechanical sensors
4. New Second Edition of Biotechnology and the Federal Circuit Examines the Courts Decisions on Chemical, Biotechnology, and Pharmaceutical Patent Law Cases
5. Electron billiards in nanoscale circuits
6. Scientists strive to replace silicon with graphene on nanocircuitry
7. Federal Circuit Rules in Marteks Favor in Appeal of Patent Infringement Case
8. MIT, BU engineer cellular circuits that count events
9. Novel CU-Boulder technique shrinks size of nanotechnology circuitry
10. Talecris Biotherapeutics Announces Record Date for 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders
11. Sharpest microscope tip lands Canadas Nanotech Institute in Guinness Book of World Records
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
NIST electromechanical circuit sets record beating microscopic 'drum'
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Charm Sciences, Inc. is ... has received AOAC Research Institute approval 061601. , “This is another AOAC-RI approval ... Bob Salter, Vice President of Regulatory and Industrial Affairs. “The Peel Plate methods ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016   EpiBiome , ... secured $1 million in debt financing from Silicon Valley ... up automation and to advance its drug development efforts, ... new facility. "SVB has been an incredible ... the services a traditional bank would provide," said Dr. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NC (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... In ... University Hospital in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated ... tissue. The results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Andrew D Zelenetz ... Published recently in Oncology ... touchONCOLOGY, Andrew D Zelenetz , discusses the ... is placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems ... With the patents on many biologics expiring, interest ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:3/29/2016)... LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: LEGX ... Protect are pleased to announce our successful effort to ... of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against counterfeiting and ... athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ongoing proof ... Bill Bollander , CEO states, "By inserting ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... 2016 According to ... for Consumer Industry by Type (Image, Motion, Pressure, ... & IT, Entertainment, Home Appliances, & Wearable ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market for ... USD 26.76 Billion by 2022, at a ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... March 22, 2016 Unique ... passcodes for superior security   ... provider of secure digital communications services, today announced it ... and offer enterprise customers, particularly those in the Financial ... and voice authentication within a mobile app, alongside, and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):