Navigation Links
Microscope could 'solve the cause of viruses'
Date:3/1/2011

Writing in the journal Nature Communications, the team have created a microscope which shatters the record for the smallest object the eye can see, beating the diffraction limit of light.

Previously, the standard optical microscope can only see items around one micrometre 0.001 millimetres clearly.

But now, by combining an optical microscope with a transparent microsphere, dubbed the 'microsphere nanoscope', the Manchester researchers can see 20 times smaller 50 nanometres ((5 x 10-8m) under normal lights. This is beyond the theoretical limit of optical microscopy.

This hugely-increased capacity means the scientists, led by Professor Lin Li and Dr Zengbo Wang, could potentially examine the inside of human cells, and examine live viruses for the first time to potentially see what causes them.

The existing microscopes which have the capacity to examine tiny items electron microscopes can only see the surface of a cell rather than examining its structure and there is no tool to see a live virus visually.

The scientists, from the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, now believe they can use the microscope to detect far smaller images in the future. The new method has no theoretical limit in the size of feature that can be seen.

The new nano-imaging system is based on capturing optical, near-field virtual images, which are free from optical diffraction, and amplifying them using a microsphere, a tiny spherical particle which is further relayed and amplified by a standard optical microscope.

Professor Li, who initiated and led the research in collaboration with academics at the National University and Data Storage Institute of Singapore, believes their research could prove to be an important development.

He said: "This is a world record in terms of how small an optical microscope can go by direct imaging under a light source covering the whole range of optical spectrum.

"Not only have we been able to see items of 50 nanometres, we believe that is just the start and we will be able to see far smaller items.

"Theoretically, there is no limit on how small an object we will be able to see.

"The common way of seeing tiny items presently is with an electron microscope, and even then you cannot see inside a cell only the outside. Optical fluoresce microscopes can see inside the cells indirectly by dying them, but these dyes cannot penetrate viruses.

"Seeing inside a cell directly without dying and seeing living viruses directly could revolutionize the way cells are studied and allow us to examine closely viruses and biomedicine for the first time."

Among other tiny objects the scientists will be able to examine are anodized aluminum oxide nano-structures, and nano-patterns on Blue-Ray CVC disks, not previously visible with an optical microscope.


'/>"/>

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
0044-161-275-8387
University of Manchester
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Sharpest microscope tip lands Canadas Nanotech Institute in Guinness Book of World Records
2. Boston College receives W.M. Keck Foundation funding for nanoscale optical microscope
3. New UCLA-designed microscope records firing of thousands of individual neurons in 3-D
4. Pivoting hooks of graphenes chemical cousin could revolutionize work of electron microscopes
5. Researchers use X-ray diffraction microscope to reveal 3-D internal structure of whole cell
6. UCLA researchers use new microscope to see atoms for first time
7. The Latest in Digital USB Microscopes from Cole-Parmer
8. Nikon Corporation Acquires License From Harvard University For STORM Super Resolution Microscopy -- Will Create Innovative New N-STORM Microscope
9. Reportlinker Adds Worldwide Optical, Transmission TEM, and Scanning SEM Electron Microscope Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, 2009 to 2015
10. Under the Microscope: Micro IVF
11. AMG Launches EVOS fl, an 'Evolutionary' Fluorescence Microscope Based on Innovative EVOS Platform
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... New York , April 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... report published by Transparency Market Research "Separation Systems ... Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2015 - ... was valued at US$ 10,665.5 Mn in 2014 ... of 6.8% from 2015 to 2023 to reach ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 29, 2016 , ... Intelligent Implant Systems announced today that the two-level components ... in the United States. These components expand the capabilities of the system and ... beginning in October of 2015, the company has seen significant sales growth in 1Q ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... NEW YORK , April 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... biotechnology acceleration company reports the Company,s CEO  was ... capital titled Accelerators Enter When VCs Fear To ... Life Science Leader magazine is an ... work for everything from emerging biotechs to Big ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... As part of an ... experts, and expanding its LATAM network and logistics capabilities. Enhancements have been ... their clinical trial projects. , The expansion will provide unmatched clinical trial logistics ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:3/15/2016)... 2016 Yissum Research Development Company of ... of the Hebrew University, announced today the formation of ... of various human biological indicators. Neteera Technologies has completed ... private investors. ... of electromagnetic emissions from sweat ducts, enables reliable and ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... http://www.apimages.com ) - --> http://www.apimages.com ) - ... Images ( http://www.apimages.com ) - Germany . ... new refugee identity cards. DERMALOG will be unveiling this device, and ... Hanover next week.   --> Germany ... the new refugee identity cards. DERMALOG will be unveiling this device, ...
(Date:3/10/2016)... , March 10, 2016   Unisys Corporation ... and Border Protection (CBP) is testing its biometric identity ... San Diego to help identify certain non-U.S. citizens ... . The test, designed to help determine the efficiency and ... began in February and will run until May 2016. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):