Navigation Links
MU researchers identify key plant immune response in fight against bacteria
Date:12/12/2011

COLUMBIA, Mo. Researchers at the University of Missouri have found a key process in a plant's immune system response that may help future crops fight off dangerous diseases.

"We study how Arabidopsis, a common weed related to the mustard plant, fends off infectious agents," said Walter Gassmann, professor of plant sciences and researcher for the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center and Interdisciplinary Plant Group. "We have discovered that a protein within the plant known as Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1 (EDS1) not only plays a key role in the plant's defense but also contributes to the direct recognition of disease agents. Arabidopsis has a widely known genetic structure, and its bacterial pathogens share many tactics with other pathogens such as fungal rusts and mildews. So, if we can translate Arabidopsis' immune response to other plants, we could eventually help crops, such as soybeans, resist devastating infections."

Gassmann compares plant and pathogen interactions to warfare. For example, bacterial speck targets "communication hubs" of the plant immune system to suppress the plant's immune system response long enough to invade and cause disease in tomato and Arabidopsis plant tissue. The present study identified EDS1 as one such hub under attack. Meanwhile, in resistant plants, immune receptors that act as sentinels guarding EDS1 detect the invader's attack and trigger an alarm that leads to a vigorous plant defense response. Gassmann believes that further studies on EDS1 and its sentinels could determine how to add the alarm response to plants missing the protein or amplify the response in plants that have the protein.

"Farmers know that deploying plants with single sentinels, which commonly only detect a single specific attack strategy, only leads to a boom and bust cycle for disease resistant crop plants," Gassmann said. "Farmers are now to the point where in a crop they must stagger multiple sentinels against each pathogen in order to keep plant diseases from spreading. If we can identify the actual targets in the plant, like EDS1, and manipulate these genes in key crops, we could extend the planting cycles for a longer period of time. We're still a long way from application in the field; however, this addition could ultimately produce more food."

While genetically modified plants still cause controversy, Gassmann believes that assisting plants with disease resistance derived from nature is better than the use of fungicides. Gassmann also studies how grape production could be improved by using genes from the Missouri Norton grape, which resists powdery mildew, in an effort to alleviate chemical use.

"If we understand the deeper level of plant immunity, we can develop a smarter way of breeding plants that are generally resistant to devastating diseases," Gassmann said.

Gassmann's paper, "Pathogen effectors target Arabidopsis EDS1 and alter its interactions with immune regulators," has been accepted by the journal Science. Co-authors at the University of Missouri include post-doctoral researchers Saikat Bhattacharjee and Sang Hee Kim, who has since moved to Indiana University, and undergraduate researcher Morgan Halane from Sedalia, MO. The study was funded by the National Science Foundation.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christian Basi
BasiC@missouri.edu
573-882-4430
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology technology :

1. Researchers develop one of the worlds smallest electronic circuits
2. Two Top Biological Imaging Centers Offer Powerful Free Online Tool to Researchers, Educators, and Public
3. Penn and Brown researchers demonstrate earthquake friction effect at the nanoscale
4. UCLA researchers demonstrate fully printed carbon nanotube transistor circuits for displays
5. Innovative MetaMorph® NX Software Shatters Barriers Between Researchers and Image Analysis Goals with Exclusive Visual Workflow
6. Researchers shrink tumors and minimize side effects using tumor-homing peptide to deliver treatment
7. Multidisciplinary team of researchers develop world’s lightest material
8. In new quantum-dot LED design, researchers turn troublesome molecules to their advantage
9. New England Biolabs Introduces Polbase, an Information Repository of Scientific Data for Polymerase Researchers
10. Researchers roll out a new form of lighting
11. University of Toronto researchers create worlds most efficient flexible OLED on plastic
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
MU researchers identify key plant  immune response in fight against bacteria
(Date:6/27/2016)... 2016  Alex,s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF), a leading ... open a state-of-the-art bioinformatics lab, using ,big data, to ... comes as Liz Scott , co-executive director of ... Summit in Washington, D.C. , hosted ... and advocate of pediatric cancer research and awareness. ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... June 27, 2016  Global demand for enzymes ... through 2020 to $7.2 billion.  This market includes ... cleaning products, biofuel production, animal feed, and other ... and biocatalysts). Food and beverages will remain the ... increasing consumption of products containing enzymes in developing ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... GUELPH, ON , June 27, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - BIOREM ... it has been advised by its major shareholders, Clean ... LP, United States based venture ... common shares of Biorem (on a fully diluted, as ... for the disposition of their entire equity holdings in ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... SAN DIEGO , June 27, 2016  Sequenom, ... company committed to enabling healthier lives through the development ... Supreme Court of the United States ... Federal courts that the claims of Sequenom,s U.S. Patent ... the patent eligibility criteria established by the Supreme Court,s ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:5/16/2016)... 16, 2016   EyeLock LLC , a market ... opening of an IoT Center of Excellence in ... the development of embedded iris biometric applications. ... convenience and security with unmatched biometric accuracy, making it ... from DNA. EyeLock,s platform uses video technology to deliver ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... and BANGALORE, India , April 28, 2016 ... a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: INFY ), ... a global partnership that will provide end customers ... mobile banking and payment services.      (Logo: ... innovation area for financial services, but it also plays a ...
(Date:4/19/2016)... , UAE, April 20, 2016 ... implemented as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution for ... biometric fingerprint reader or the door interface with integration ... modern access control systems. The minimal dimensions of the ... readers into the building installations offer considerable freedom of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):