Navigation Links
MIT: Leveraging learning for artificial respiration
Date:9/11/2007

CAMBRIDGE, MA- MIT researchers have found that the body's innate ability to adapt to recurring stimuli could be leveraged to design more effective and less costly artificial respirators. The new approach could minimize the need for the induced sedation or paralysis currently necessary for some patients on mechanical ventilation.

Nonassociative learning, or our innate ability to adapt to recurring stimuli, is the focus of work to be described in the September 12 issue of PLoS ONE, the online, open-access journal from the Public Library of Science.

Specifically, Chi-Sang Poon, a research scientist at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST), and colleagues examined rats under mechanical ventilation to see how they applied different forms of nonassociative learning to adapt to the rhythm imposed by the respirator.

Existing respirators do not consider the adaptive nature of breathing in their design. Some ignore the patient's natural rhythm and pump air in and out of the lungs on set intervals. As a result, doctors often must sedate or paralyze patients to prevent them from fighting an unfamiliar rhythm. Other respirator designs rely entirely on the patient to trigger the airflow. These systems, however, are costly and tend to be unreliable for weak patients such as newborns or those in critical care.

The MIT research suggests, however, that if a doctor takes the patient's natural breathing rhythm into account and sets the ventilator's rhythm in that same range, the patient will adapt and synchronize with the ventilator. This new approach could minimize the need for induced sedation or paralysis.

We have intrinsic nonassociative learning capabilities, called habituation and desensitization, that [can] make up for changes in the spontaneous rhythm due to artificial lung inflation, says Poon.

In tests of rats under artificial respiration, Poon found that, if using a suitable rhythm, rats adapted to the mechanical ventilation. He also found that this learning capability enabled mice to adapt to an artificial rhythm even when the mechanical respirators applied constant air pressure. The rats effectively tuned out this extra pressure, filtering it out as background noise. When Poon disabled the neural pathways involved in nonassociative learning, the rats' ability to adapt was either eliminated or compromised.

Though nonassociative learning is familiar and commonly applied to smelling roses and adjusting to sunlight after emerging from a dark movie theater, it is not usually applied in a clinical environment. Because of their focus on stabilizing patients, clinicians often discount the power of learning. "Many ventilators are designed as if the patient were never in the equation, says Poon. But it turns out, our vital functions can learn to adapt in order to survive.


'/>"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Kind approach to leveraging biofuels
2. Distance-Learning Remote Laboratories using LabVIEW
3. Learning from the big boys: With technology, women urged to go gradual
4. Video game learning has no traction in K-12
5. TechnoJungle to highlight learning, innovation
6. Gaming conference explores interactive media in learning
7. Learning to swim in the global talent pool
8. Schmidt rejoins Renaissance Learning
9. Learning how far your message reaches by Googling yourself
10. Charter Business powers distance learning
11. Renaissance Learning CEO resigns to start company
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017 For today, Stock-Callers.com redirects investors, ... development and clinical research aimed at treating diseases and medical ... Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: KERX), Kite Pharma Inc. (NASDAQ: KITE), ... can access our complimentary research reports on these stocks now ... http://stock-callers.com/registration ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... A number of new instruments have recently emerged to accommodate ... Protein and Cell Analysis Education Webinar Series , will focus on advances in ... and future applications. , Many flow cytometers have unique capabilities and the Attune ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... ... April 18, 2017 , ... Optofluidics today announced ... comes after the company changed focus to making analytical tools for biopharmaceutical quality ... new technology,” says CEO Robert Hart. Founders Bernardo Cordovez, Robert Hart and David ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... ... April 19, 2017 , ... ThermaGenix, the PCR Improvement ... adds to several other early achievements at ThermaGenix, including the business formation and ... , ThermaGenix will use proceeds from the Series A-1 round to:, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric Vehicle ... around 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 million ... estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on global as ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Calif. , March 21, 2017 ... analytics company serving law enforcement agencies, announced today the ... as director of public safety business development. ... diversified law enforcement experience, including a focus on the ... In his most recent position, Mr. Sheridan served as ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... , Australia , March 9, ... study data at the prestigious World Lung Imaging Workshop ... Andreas Fouras , was invited to deliver the ... pulmonary medicine. This globally recognised event brings together leaders ... share the latest developments in lung imaging. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):