Navigation Links
It takes nerves for flies to keep a level head
Date:7/21/2008

The nerve connections that keep a fly's gaze stable during complex aerial manoeuvres, enabling it to respond quickly to obstacles in its flight path, are revealed in new detail in research published today (22 July 2008).

Scientists from Imperial College London have described the connections between two key sets of nerve cells in a fly's brain that help it process what it sees and fast-track that information to its muscles. This helps it stay agile and respond quickly to its environment while on the move.

The study, published in the journal PLoS Biology, is an important step towards understanding how nervous systems operate, and could help us improve our knowledge of more complex animals. It could also be used to improve technical control systems in autonomous air vehicles - robots that stay stable in the air without crashing and with no need for remote control.

Just as goalkeepers need to keep their heads level when flying through the air for a save, no matter how they tilt their bodies, so flies need to keep their gaze steady during their slightly more complicated areal manoeuvres. This enables them to process visual information about their surrounding environment more efficiently and modify their movements accordingly.

The new research shows that the way in which two populations of nerve cells, or neurons, communicate with each other is the key. The lobula plate tangential cells receive input from the eyes. This generates small electrical signals that inform the fly about how it is turning and moving during its aerial stunts.

The signals pass on to a second set of neurons that connect to the neck muscles, and stabilise the fly's head and thus its line of sight.

Lead researcher, Dr Holger Krapp, from Imperial's Department of Bioengineering says the pathway from visual signal to head movement is ingeniously designed: it uses information from both eyes, is direct, and does not require heavy computing power. He continues:

"Anyone who has watched one fly chasing another at incredibly high speed, without crashing or bumping into anything, can appreciate the high-end flight performance of these animals.

"They manage even though they see the world in poor definition: their version of the world is like a heavily pixelated photo compared with human vision. However, they do have one major advantage. They can update and process visual information more than ten times faster than humans, which is vital for an insect that relies on fast sensory feedback to maintain its agility."

Dr Krapp adds: "Keeping the head level and gaze steady is a fundamental task for all animals that rely on vision to help control their movements. Understanding the underlying principles in simple model systems like flies could give us useful leads on how more complex creatures achieve similar tasks."


'/>"/>

Contact: Colin Smith
cd.smith@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46712
Imperial College London
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Nanotechnology: Learning from past mistakes
2. Cystic Fibrosis - Axentis Pharma Takes Over Patents and Continues Development of Innovative Platform Technology
3. Simbionix Takes Non-Invasive GYN Surgical Training to the Next Level
4. Migenix Takes Operational Actions To Extend Cash Past Upcoming Key Milestones
5. Board Certified Dermatologist and President-Elect of the Dermatologic Society of Greater New York, Dr. Lance H. Brown Takes His Comprehensive Practice to East Hampton, NY
6. Tepper School Team Takes Top Honors at Global Moot Corp(R) Competition
7. Ganeden Biotech Takes Sustenex(TM) National with GanedenBC30 Probiotic
8. White Paper Advises Pharma Manufacturers on How to Select an Aseptic Fill/Finish Contractor, Avoid the Most Common Mistakes
9. Ground-Breaking Conference Takes on Abortion
10. First European IGRT School Takes Place for Radiotherapy Practitioners in UK
11. N.C. Takes Biofuels Leadership, Establishes New Endeavor With $5 Million State Appropriation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... Clinovo , the ... validated Electronic Data Capture (EDC) system ClinCaptureand its new Contract Research Organization (CRO) ... 2016 Conference in San Mateo, California on February 10th and 11th. Watch ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... The American Academy of ... it is offering its 2016 AAT Member Certification Qualification Course for Technicians via a ... the webinar, which will include a detailed review of hardware, software, and camera setup/operations, ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... ... for Public Policy for the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). Dorman will ... ensure their voices are heard throughout the drug regulatory review process. , “Adding ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... 2016 This market research report on the ... prospects of the market in terms of revenue (USD ... in the manufacture of microbiology culture media and related ... market snapshot providing the overall information of various market ... section also provides the overall information and data analysis ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:2/3/2016)... 3, 2016 ... the "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market ... Others), Software Tools (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition ... Regions - Global forecast to 2020" ... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/d8zjcd/emotion_detection ) has announced the addition ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... Technology Enhancements Accelerate Growth of X-ray Imaging ... and computed radiography markets in Thailand ... Indonesia (TIM). It provides an in-depth analysis ... as regional market drivers and restraints. The study offers ... market attractiveness, both for digital and computed radiography. Market ...
(Date:2/1/2016)... 2016  Today, the first day of American Heart ... develop a first of its kind workplace health solution ... In the first application of Watson ... ), and Welltok will create a new offering that ... analytics, delivered on Welltok,s health optimization platform. The effort ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):