Navigation Links
Image sensors out of a spray can
Date:1/22/2013

This press release is available in German.

Image sensors are at the core of every digital camera. Before a snapshot appears on the display, the sensors first convert the light from the lens to electrical signals. The image processor then uses these to create the final photo.

Many compact and cellphone cameras contain silicon-based image sensors produced using CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology. Prof. Paolo Lugli and Dr. Daniela Baierl from TUM have developed a cost-effective process to improve the performance of these CMOS sensors. Their approach revolves around an ultra-thin film made of organic compounds, in other words plastics.

The challenge lay in applying the plastic solution to the surface of the image sensors. The researchers tested spin- and spray-coating methods to apply the plastic in its liquid, solution form as precisely and cost-effectively as possible. They were looking for a smooth plastic film that is no more than a few hundred nanometers thick. Spray-coating was found to be the best method, using either a simple spray gun or a spray robot.

Thin coating with high sensitivity to light

Organic sensors have already proven their worth in tests: They are up to three times more sensitive to light than conventional CMOS sensors, whose electronic components conceal some of the pixels, and therefore the photoactive silicon surface.

Organic sensors can be manufactured without the expensive post-processing step typically required for CMOS sensors, which involves for example applying micro-lenses to increase the amount of captured light. Every part of every single pixel, including the electronics, is sprayed with the liquid polymer solution, giving a surface that is 100 percent light-sensitive. The low noise and high frame rate properties of the organic sensors also make them a good fit for cameras.

Potential for developing low-cost infrared sensors

Another advantage of the plastic sensors is that different chemical compounds can be used to capture different parts of the light spectrum. For example, the PCBM and P3HT polymers are ideal for the detection of visible light. Other organic compounds, like squaraine dyes, are sensitive to light in the near-infrared region.

"By choosing the right organic compounds, we are able to develop new applications that were too costly up until now," explains Prof. Paolo Lugli, who holds the Chair of Nanoelectronics at TUM. "The future uses of organic infrared sensors include driver assistance systems for night vision and regular compact and cellphone cameras. Yet, the lack of suitable polymers is the main hurdle."


'/>"/>
Contact: Undine Ziller
ziller@zv.tum.de
49-892-892-2731
Technische Universitaet Muenchen
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology technology :

1. MTA Releases Image of R Train Ceiling Rusting from Sandy Flooding; Rusty Cage Advises Hurricane Victims to Solve Rust Problems with Green Rusterizer
2. CoreLab Partners, Medical Image Assessment Experts, Announces Its Entry Into the Early Alzheimers Imaging Market Space
3. mPlexus to Launch Image Sharing and Retrieval Software at RSNA Convention
4. Global Medical Image Analysis Software Market Worth $2.4 Billion by 2017
5. Jubilant DraxImage And Positron Enter Into A Strategic Collaboration On The Sourcing And Supply Of Strontium-82 And Rubidium-82 Generators
6. Flat lens offers a perfect image
7. Frost & Sullivan: Asia Pacific Infectious Disease Diagnostics Market Grows as Economies Boom and Countries Become Image Conscious
8. Glencoe Software and The Journal of Cell Biology Pioneer Publishing of Massive, Ultra-Resolution Images
9. ClearCanvas Releases New Workstation Products Designed to Assist With Image Sharing
10. Imaging Contract-Research Pioneer, Donald P. Rosen, MD, Named CEO of ACR Image Metrix™
11. Researchers capture first-ever images of atoms moving in a molecule
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Image sensors out of a spray can
(Date:1/11/2017)... Angeles, California (PRWEB) , ... January 11, 2017 ... ... approach to support fertility specialists with accurate and reliable preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). ... we have achieved excellent results,” says Ovation Fertility Genetics Scientific Director Amy ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Brian Mehling, M.D., world-renowned stem cell ... Horizon International (BHI), will be attending the 47th Annual ... from January 17-20, 2017. This will be Dr. ... The theme of this year,s forum is Responsive and ... will address strategies for fostering greater social inclusion and ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... , ... January 11, 2017 , ... ... scientific grants to ground-breaking microbiome studies. Its most recent microbiome impact grant award ... who will study the effect of long-term use of oral antibiotics, prescribed for ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... ... January 11, 2017 , ... Symbios ... today that the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Symbios a Small ... be used to commercialize the Symbios Tubular Plasma Reactor™ (TPR™) by scaling the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:1/6/2017)... 2017  SomaLogic announced today that it has ... by iCarbonX, the China -based ... Digital Health Ecosystem that can define each person,s ... biological, behavioral and psychological data, the Internet and ... SomaLogic will provide proteomics data and applications expertise ...
(Date:1/3/2017)... VEGAS , Jan. 3, 2017 Onitor, ... the introduction of Onitor Track, an innovative biometric data-driven ... men, showcasing this month at the 2017 Consumer Electronics ... In the U.S., the World Health ... more than two-thirds of adults who are overweight or ...
(Date:12/20/2016)... 2016   Valencell , the leading innovator ... STMicroelectronics (NYSE: STM), a global semiconductor leader serving ... today the launch of a new, highly accurate ... includes ST,s compact SensorTile turnkey multi-sensor ... sensor system. Together, SensorTile and Benchmark deliver the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):