Navigation Links
Grove School professor leads new metamaterials center

A new National Science Foundation-sponsored industry & university cooperative research center program (I/UCRC) will "provide a one-stop shop for the design, fabrication and testing of a wide range of metamaterials." Dr. David Crouse, associate professor of electrical engineering in the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York, serves as director of the new Center for Metamaterials.

Participating institutions are The City University of New York, Western Carolina University, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Clarkson University. At least 15 corporations, including Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, Corning and Goodrich, will become members of the center, which has NSF funding for five years, renewable, as well. First year support - $230,000 from NSF plus $40,000 from each of the companies is expected to be around $740,000, according to Professor Crouse.

Obtaining the award to create the new Center took several years and involved several stages and numerous people at CUNY and the other schools. They include Dr. Myron Wecker and Dr. John Blaho, of the CUNY Center for Advanced Technology (CUNY-CAT), CUNY Vice Chancellor for Research Gillian Small and the co-directors from the three other institutions:

  • Dr. Weiguo (Bill) Wang, assistant professor of electrical engineering, Western Carolina University;
  • Dr. Michael O. Fiddy, professor of physics and optical science and of electrical and computer engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
  • Dr. S.V. Babu, distinguished university professor, Clarkson University.

"Metamaterials have capabilities beyond normal materials," Professor Crouse explains. "The best known examples are cloaking devices that allow light to wrap around an object, creating the perception of invisibility. Numerous other examples can be found in renewable energy and sensors."

Researchers at the I/UCRC Center for Metamaterials will focus on fundamental research concepts that are limiting the application and implementation of metamaterials to commercial products. For example, by controlling the composition of a material it may be possible to produce super lenses with near-perfect resolution.

The Center's research thrusts will encompass fundamental metamaterials research including:

  • Materials for rapid prototyping.
  • Metamaterials building blocks.
  • All-dielectric resonator metamaterials.
  • Development of modeling and design algorithms.
  • Process development of composite materials.
  • Aperture and cavity arrays.
  • Tools for characterization of metamaterials.
  • Next-generation metallic resonator metamaterials.
  • High/Zero/Negative Refractive Index Materials.

NSF-supported I/UCRC centers conduct pre-competitive fundamental research. The companies that participate in the center direct the research thrusts and receive royalty-free, non-exclusive licenses to the intellectual property the center produces.

Professor Crouse also serves as director of the CUNY Center for Advanced Technology (CUNY-CAT), which is supported by the State of New York and conducts research leading to product commercialization. The three other institutions in the Center for Metamaterials have programs similar to CUNY-CAT, he notes.

"We want the Center for Metamaterials to be a feeder for concepts and projects that graduate into more applied development with our CAT program and the other organizations, eventually leading to commercialization and economic impact," he adds.

Professor Crouse's metamaterials research laboratory at CCNY performs numerous applied metamaterials research and development projects. He also conducts research for Phoebus Optoelectronics, a metamaterials company he co-founded.

While the Center for Metamaterials research thrusts are on fundamental research concepts, the thrusts of Professor Crouse's laboratory and Phoebus are applied research and the development of metamaterials devices with high commercialization potential.

Two areas of particular interest to him are: renewable energy and sensors. "The typical solar cell has low efficiency, but we can do things to improve their efficiency or lower their cost to make them more competitive with fossil fuels," he says.

Placing thin metamaterial films over silicon panels would allow solar light to pass through to silicon surfaces unblocked. The same film would capture the electricity produced by those surfaces. This could raise efficiency of terrestrial solar cells, now made with embedded thin metal strips, from 17 percent to 21 percent, he adds. Because the film would spread light laterally across the cell, thinner silicon wafers could be used, which would reduce the cost.

Three projects currently underway at Professor Crouse's laboratory involve creation of metamaterials for a hydrogen-powered generation device, biofuel-powered generation and splitting light so it could be directed to specific locations on a device. "It could be that different materials respond better to different elements of the spectrum," he explains. "We could create a light harvester that would direct different elements to where they would be used most efficiently."

The sensor projects, being conducted with NASA and DARPA (Defense Advance Research Projects Agency), aim to produce lightweight polar image metric sensors capable of measuring light's intensity, color and polarization or orientation. "If you can see the orientation of light, you can detect many properties of an object," he continues.

"For example, NASA scientists could detect and analyze the chemical composition of different kinds of pollutants." Current sensor technology is fragile and heavy and has poor resolution, he adds.

Besides Professor Crouse, CUNY faculty affiliated with the Center for Metamaterials include:

  • Dr. Robert R. Alfano, CUNY distinguished professor of science and engineering, The City College of New York;
  • Dr. Azriel Z. Genack, distinguished professor of physics, Queens College;
  • Dr. Vinod M. Menon, associate professor of physics, Queens College, and
  • Dr. Godfrey Gumbs, CUNY distinguished professor of physics, Hunter College.


Contact: Ellis Simon
City College of New York

Related biology technology :

1. Mtech Bioprocess Scale-Up Facility to Double in Staff and Size, Expand to Shady Grove, Create Pilot Plant for Biofuels in College Park
2. Grove Gift Launches Translational Medicine Program at UCSF & UC Berkeley
3. University of Maryland School of Medicine publishes scientific paper on 2001 anthrax attacks
4. 34 percent of Galician secondary schools exceed maximum recommended radon levels
5. New Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Study Shows Masimo Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring is Accurate During Complex Spine Surgeries
6. NOVAVAX and University of Massachusetts Medical School Publish Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Virus-like Particle (VLP) Vaccine Candidate
7. 34 percent of Galician secondary schools exceed maximum recommended radon levels
8. MicroConstants Celebrates National Chemistry Week by Teaching San Diego High School Students About the Drug Development Process
9. YM Biosciences To Present Poster On CYT387 At The European School Of Haematology International Conference
10. Back To School: Staying Healthy at School is as Easy as Learning Your ABCs
11. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Adopts BioSoteria's eLearning Drug Safety Courses
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/8/2015)...  The ALS Association, in partnership with Prize4Life, is ... revolutionize communication technology solutions for people living with ALS. ... (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that ... spinal cord. Eventually, people with ALS lose the ability ... to total paralysis and death within two to five ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... ... ... Talon Innovations, a provider of Precision Machined Products and Assemblies ... one of three finalists for the Minnesota Business magazine’s Manufacturing Award in the category ... was recognized as a nominee for this competitive award. , The “Best in ...
(Date:10/7/2015)... , Oct. 7, 2015 Boston ... the start of the Boston Scientific Connected Patient ... advancements in the use of remote patient monitoring to ... designers and entrepreneurs can submit their ideas and collaborate ... ( ). Cambridge, MA ...
(Date:10/7/2015)... -- ContraVir Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: CTRV ) ("ContraVir" or ... and commercialization of targeted antiviral therapies, today announced the ... of its common stock and warrants to purchase up ... a fixed combined price to the public of $3.00. ... issued separately.  The warrants will be exercisable for a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
... Acids, RP-HPLC, Precolumn derivatisation, o-Phthalaldehyde (OPA), 2-Mercaptopropionic acid, Ultraviolet ... Introduction: , ... in the UV/visible spectrum. In order to increase sensitivity, their ... amino acids react with a precursor to yield a ...
... For reliable whole genome amplification from human mitochondrial DNA ... , ... whole genome amplification from human mitochondrial,DNA in total DNA samples. ... from nuclear,DNA, thus avoiding the need for time-consuming isolation of ...
... For purification of microRNA and total RNA from a wide ... miRNeasy Kits allow purification of total RNA including miRNA ... The miRNeasy Mini Kit is suitable for , low-throughput ... purification in a 96-well format. , , ...
Cached Biology Technology:
(Date:9/29/2015)... Calif. , Sept. 29, 2015 ... improves employee productivity while also saving energy , ... such as Low Power Active Mode and embedded Fujitsu ... transformation Fujitsu today shows that good ... new and refreshed models to its enterprise desktop and ...
(Date:9/28/2015)... 2015 According to a new ... Product (Scanner & Others), Application (Access Control & Others), ... & Geography Global - Forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, ... 3627.90 Million by 2020, at a CAGR of 23.40% ... market data T ables and 66 ...
(Date:9/10/2015)... This report provides detailed descriptions of the ... emerging sensor types that will dominate in the future. ... the wearable technology hype curve in the last five ... feature with all of them is the prominence of ... useful functions. Sensors collect data about the physical and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
... better understanding of brain injury, a way to rejuvenate ... monitor their glaucoma at home, number among this years ... What surprises me every time I walk through ... involving so many NJIT graduate and undergraduate students, said ...
... French . , A new brain-imaging study by ... ghrelin - a stomach hormone, acts on specific regions of ... and eating for pleasure. This study, published in the ... understanding and treating obesity, a condition affecting millions world-wide. ...
... The potential of no-tillage (NT) soils for increasing the soil ... Most of the previous studies about SOC accrual in NT ... depth), and not for the whole soil profile. The lack ... to conclusively ascertain the effects of NT farming on SOC ...
Cached Biology News:
Mouse monoclonal [050-04] to C2 ( Abpromise for all tested applications). entrezGeneID: 717 SwissProtID: P06681...
Reacts with methylated DNA from plants and vertebrates...
Rabbit polyclonal to Bag5 ( Abpromise for all tested applications). entrezGeneID: 9529 SwissProtID: Q9UL15...
Biology Products: