Navigation Links
Gladstone scientists identify role of tiny RNAs in controlling stem cell fate
Date:3/5/2008

SAN FRANCISCO, CA March 6, 2008--Researchers at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease (GICD) and the University of California, San Francisco have identified for the first time how tiny genetic factors called microRNAs may influence the differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells into cardiac muscle. As reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell, scientists in the lab of GICD Director, Deepak Srivastava, MD, demonstrated that two microRNAs, miR-1 and miR-133, which have been associated with muscle development, not only encourage heart muscle formation, but also actively suppress genes that could turn the ES cells into undesired cells like neurons or bone.

Understanding how pluripotent stem cells can be used in therapy requires that we understand the myriad processes and factors that influence cell fate, said Dr. Srivastava. This work shows that microRNAs can function both in directing how ES cells change into specific cellsas well as preventing these cells from developing into unwanted cell types.

The differentiation of ES cells into heart cells or any other type of adult cell is a very complicated process involving many factors. MicroRNAS, or miRNAs, seem to act as rheostats or dimmer switches to fine-tune levels of important proteins in cells. More than 450 human miRNAs have been described and each is predicted to regulate tens if not hundreds of proteins that may determine cellular differentiation.

While many ES cell-specific miRNAs have been identified, the role of individual miRNAs in ES cell differentiation had not previously been determined. The Gladstone team showed that miRNAs can control how pluripotent stem cells determine their fate, or cell lineage in this case as cardiac muscle cells.

Specifically, they found that miR-1 and miR-133 are active at the early stages of heart cell formation, when an ES cell is first deciding to become mesoderm, one of the three basic tissue layers in mammals and other organisms. Activity of either miR-1 or miR-133 in ES cells caused genes that encourage mesoderm formation to be turned on. Equally important, they caused other genes that would have told the cell to become ectoderm or endoderm to turn off. For example, expression of a specific factor called Delta-like 1 was repressed by miR-1. Removal of this factor from cells by other methods also caused the cells to begin transforming into heart cells.

Our findings provide insight into the fine regulation of cells and genes that is needed for a heart to form, said Kathy Ivey, PhD, a California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) postdoctoral fellow and lead author on the study. By better understanding this complicated system, in the future, we may be able to identify ways to treat or prevent childhood and adult diseases that affect the heart.


'/>"/>

Contact: Valerie Tucker
vtucker@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2019
Gladstone Institutes
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Gladstone scientists uncover potential mechanism of memory loss in Alzheimers disease
2. K-State Preparing to Share Expertise With Bioscientists
3. Nanotechs health, environmental impacts worry scientists and the public
4. Transplanted cells may hold the key to curing hemophilia A, Einstein scientists report
5. UA optical scientists add new, practical dimension to holography
6. Berkeley scientists bring MRI/NMR to microreactors
7. Venter Institute Scientists Create First Synthetic Bacterial Genome
8. American Scientists Named as Laureates of the 2008 (24th) Japan Prize
9. Scientists discover new method of observing interactions in nanoscale systems
10. Carbon offset warning from international team of scientists
11. Study Examines Media Preferences of Life Scientists in Applied Markets
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Most consumers engage ... fingerprint recognition for secure access, voice recognition for hands-free communication, and facial recognition ... interacting with biometrics technology today. But if they asked Joey Pritikin, Vice ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2016 ... ... appointed Greg Lamka, PhD to its Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Lamka will assist ... of plant pathogen detection. , PathSensors deploys the CANARY® test platform for ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ReportsnReports.com adds 2016 global ... on US, EU, China ... healthcare business intelligence collection of its growing online ... on the Flow Cytometry market spread across 153 ... tables and figures is now available at ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... , ... Mr. Palmer created the RPO business for Ceridian and lead the ... services contract in the U.S. intelligence community with The SI (a Lockheed Martin divestiture). ... founder of Accolo. “We are growing and his experience guiding our expansion is ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:3/23/2016)... Massachusetts , March 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... im Interesse erhöhter Sicherheit Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung ... Xura, Inc. (NASDAQ: MESG ), ... bekannt, dass das Unternehmen mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, ... aus der Finanzdienstleistungsbranche, wird die Möglichkeit angeboten, ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... Ontario , PROVO and ... Newborn Screening Ontario (NSO), which operates the ... for molecular testing, and Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, ... management technology respectively, today announced the launch of a ... next-generation sequencing (NGS) testing panel. NSO ...
(Date:3/18/2016)... 18, 2016 --> ... ICT, Manned & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure and Perimeter Surveillance ... in the border security market and the continuing migration crisis ... Europe has led visiongain to publish this ... --> defence & security companies in the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):