Navigation Links
Decellularized mouse heart beats again after regenerating with human heart precursor cells

PITTSBURGH, Aug. 13, 2013 For the first time, a mouse heart was able to contract and beat again after its own cells were stripped and replaced with human heart precursor cells, said scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, reported online today in Nature Communications, show the promise that regenerating a functional organ by placing human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells which could be personalized for the recipient in a three-dimensional scaffold could have for transplantation, drug testing models and understanding heart development.

In the United States, one person dies of heart disease every 34 seconds, and more than 5 million people suffer from heart failure, meaning a reduced ability to pump blood, said senior investigator Lei Yang, Ph.D., assistant professor of developmental biology, Pitt School of Medicine. More than half of heart disease patients do not respond to current therapies and there is a scarcity of donor organs for transplant.

"Scientists have been looking to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering approaches to find new solutions for this important problem," Dr. Yang said. "The ability to replace a piece of tissue damaged by a heart attack, or perhaps an entire organ, could be very helpful for these patients."

For the project, the research team first "decellularized," or removed all the cells, from a mouse heart, a process that takes about 10 hours using a variety of agents. Then, they repopulated the remaining heart framework, or scaffold, with multipotential cardiovascular progenitor (MCP) cells. These replacement cells were produced by reverse engineering fibroblast cells from a small skin biopsy to make induced pluripotent stem cells and then treating the iPS cells with special growth factors to further induce differentiation.

"This process makes MCPs, which are precursor cells that can further differentiate into three kinds of cells the heart uses, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells," Dr. Yang explained. "Nobody has tried using these MCPs for heart regeneration before. It turns out that the heart's extracellular matrix the material that is the substrate of heart scaffold can send signals to guide the MCPs into becoming the specialized cells that are needed for proper heart function."

After a few weeks, the mouse heart had not only been rebuilt with human cells, it also began contracting again, at the rate of 40 to 50 beats per minute, the researchers found. More work must be done to make the heart contract strongly enough to be able to pump blood effectively, and to rebuild the heart's electrical conduction system correctly so that the heart rate speeds up and slows down appropriately.

In the future, it might be possible to take a simple skin biopsy from a patient to derive personalized MCPs that can be used to seed a biologic scaffold and regenerate a replacement organ suitable for transplantation, Dr. Yang noted. The model also could be used as a lab-based method to preclinically test the effect of new drugs on the heart or to study how the fetal heart might develop.

"One of our next goals is to see if it's feasible to make a patch of human heart muscle," he added. "We could use patches to replace a region damaged by a heart attack. That might be easier to achieve because it won't require as many cells as a whole human-sized organ would."


Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Related biology technology :

1. New Online Course Explores Mouse as Model for Prostate Cancer
2. GeneTex Introduces New Mouse Monoclonal Antibody Against the Ten-Eleven Translocation 1 (TET1) Protein for DNA Methylation/Epigenetics Research
3. A Long-Awaited Mouse Offers a New Animal Model for FSH Muscular Dystrophy
4. University of Colorado Cancer Center Study Shows that Bitter Melon Juice Prevents Pancreatic Cancer in Mouse Models
5. The Veterinary Bioscience Institute Announces a Mouse Surgery Webinar Series
6. Kymab Announces Launch of Kymouse HK
7. SPX-106T Arrests Development of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Mouse Model of Cardiovascular Disease
8. A mouse model brings new perspectives on Lafora disease
9. Over 50% of “Best Heart Hospitals” in U.S. News & World Report Are Certified to Implant the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart
10. 1st Pediatric SynCardia Total Artificial Heart Patient in Turkey Celebrates 18th Birthday
11. Robots Strike Fear in the Hearts of Fish
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... , November 27, 2015 ... Growing popularity of companion diagnostics is ... cancer biomarkers market with pharmaceutical companies and ... companion diagnostic tests. . ... Complete report on global cancer biomarkers ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , November 25, 2015 2 ... première fois les différences entre les souches bactériennes ... celles des êtres humains . Ces recherches ... et envisager la prise en charge efficace de ... diagnostiqués chez les chats .    --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... IN (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... (AMA) and the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OPBAP) has been formalized with ... and other AMA team leaders met with OPBAP leaders Capt. Karl Minter and ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... The United ... recipient of the 2016 USGA Green Section Award. Presented annually since 1961, the USGA ... his or her work with turfgrass. , Clarke, of Iselin, N.J., is ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:10/23/2015)... DUBLIN , Oct. 23, 2015 Research ... of the "Global Voice Recognition Biometrics Market 2015-2019" ... --> --> The global voice recognition ... during 2014-2019. --> ... 2015-2019, has been prepared based on an in-depth market ...
(Date:10/22/2015)... Inc. (NASDAQ: AWRE ), a leading supplier of biometrics software ... September 30, 2015.  --> --> ... a decrease of 33% compared to $6.0 million in the same ... was $2.2 million, or $0.10 per diluted share, which compared to ... a year ago.  --> --> ...
(Date:10/22/2015)... , Oct. 22, 2015 About fingerprint ... fingerprint scan of an individual with the database to ... as arch, whorl, and loop. Pattern-based algorithms are used ... advances in technology, AFIS was introduced in 1986, which ... agencies to identify a criminal. Technavio,s analysts ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):