Navigation Links
Center will create self-powered health monitoring devices
Date:9/5/2012

North Carolina State University will lead a national nanotechnology research effort to create self-powered devices to help people monitor their health and understand how the surrounding environment affects it, the National Science Foundation announced today.

The NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST), to be headquartered on NC State's Centennial Campus, is a joint effort between NC State and partner institutions Florida International University, Pennsylvania State University and the University of Virginia. The center, funded by an initial five-year $18.5 million grant from NSF, also includes five affiliated universities and about 30 industry partners in its global research consortium.

"Tackling the world's grand challenges is one of NC State's strategic imperatives," said NC State Chancellor Randy Woodson. "The ASSIST center holds the potential to transform health care, leading to advanced environmental health research and enhanced environmental policy."

With the addition of ASSIST, NC State is the only university in the country currently leading two active NSF Engineering Research Centers (ERCs), among the largest and most prestigious grants made by the engineering directorate of the federal agency. The FREEDM Systems Center, a smart grid ERC formed in 2008, is also headquartered at NC State.

ASSIST researchers will use the tiniest of materials to develop self-powered health monitoring sensors and devices. These devices could be worn on the chest like a patch, on the wrist like a watch, as a cap that fits over a tooth, or in other ways, depending on the biological system that's being monitored.

Wireless health monitoring is already a fast-growing industry, but the self-powered technology being developed by ASSIST means that changing and recharging batteries on current devices could soon be a thing of the past. By using nanomaterials and nanostructures a nanowire is thousands of times thinner than a human hair and thermoelectric and piezoelectric materials that use body heat and motion, respectively, as power sources, ASSIST researchers want to make devices that operate on the smallest amounts of energy.

"Currently there are many devices out there that monitor health in different ways," said Dr. Veena Misra, the center's director and professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State. "What's unique about our technologies is the fact that they are powered by the human body, so they don't require battery charging."

These devices could transform health care by improving the way doctors, patients and researchers gather and interpret important health data. Armed with uninterrupted streams of heart rate readings, respiration rates and other health indicators, as well as personalized exposure data for environmental pollutants such as ozone and carbon monoxide, sick people could better manage chronic diseases, and healthy people could make even better decisions to keep themselves fit.

On a larger scale, data gleaned from research studies employing these devices could prove invaluable to lawmakers crafting environmental policy. And if people using the devices make better decisions about where and how healthfully they live, national health care costs, which topped $2.5 trillion in 2010, could come down.

The center's headquarters will be housed in the Larry K. Monteith Engineering Research Center on NC State's Centennial Campus. There, ASSIST researchers will develop thermoelectric materials that harvest body heat and new nanosensors that gather health information from the body such as heart rates, oxygen levels and respiration data. In addition, the researchers will find ways to package the technology developed by the center into wearable devices.

The center's partner institutions will also play important research roles. At Penn State, researchers will create new piezoelectric materials and energy-efficient transistors. The team from the University of Virginia will develop ways to make the systems work on very small amounts of power, while the group from Florida International University will create sensors that gather biochemical signals from the body, such as stress levels.

The results of that work, coupled with low-power radios developed by the University of Michigan, will be used to process and transmit health data gathered by the sensors to computers and consumer devices, such as cell phones, so patients, doctors and researchers can easily digest it. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will provide ASSIST with medical guidance and arrange testing of the center's technology.

"We have assembled a comprehensive team that works together closely under a systems-driven approach to tackle this challenging set of global health problems," Misra said.

ASSIST also has foreign partnerships with the University of Adelaide, the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology.

"The research conducted at ASSIST will help patients, doctors and scientists make direct correlations between a person's health and the surrounding environment, leading to better prediction and treatment of chronic diseases," said Dr. Louis A. Martin-Vega, dean of the College of Engineering at NC State. "The fact that NC State now leads two NSF Engineering Research Centers is a testament to our world-class engineering faculty, students and facilities."

ASSIST will also draw on the expertise of industry partners to help guide the center's work to the marketplace. These partners include companies and agencies involved in nanomaterials and nanodevices, integrated chip manufacturing, software development, bioengineering and health care.

The center will feature a nanotechnology education program, including an undergraduate concentration and a graduate master's certificate, as well as a personalized professional-development program for graduate students.

The center will also partner with 11 middle and high schools in North Carolina, Virginia, Florida and Pennsylvania to develop outreach activities that bring nanosystems engineering into K-12 classrooms. Students in partner high schools will have the chance to be involved in ASSIST research.

The five-year NSF grant for ASSIST is renewable for an additional five years and follows a two-year selection process by the federal agency. The grant is among a new group of Engineering Research Center awards that invest in nanosystems.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mick Kulikowski
mick_kulikowski@ncsu.edu
919-515-8387
North Carolina State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Two Top Biological Imaging Centers Offer Powerful Free Online Tool to Researchers, Educators, and Public
2. OvaGene Oncology Collaborates With Moffitt Cancer Center to Develop and Commercialize microRNAs Associated With Chemotherapeutic Drug Response
3. Eye Surgery Center of Michigan First in Southeast Michigan to Perform Bladeless Cataract Surgery Using New LenSx® Laser Technology
4. BioStorage Technologies Partners with Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at IU Simon Cancer Center to Raise Money and Awareness for Breast Cancer Research
5. Pacific Meso Center Receives Generous Donation to First Free-Standing Mesothelioma Research Laboratory in Los Angeles
6. Pine Grove Nursing Center Uses AccuNurse Interactive Care to Improve Care and Service Delivery
7. UH Case Medical Center Offers New Therapy for Gynecologic Cancer Patients
8. PAREXEL and ASAN Medical Center Establish Alliance to Accelerate Korea-based Drug Development and Commercialization Programs
9. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Unveils Historic World-Class Biotech Research & Innovation Center in Downtown Winston-Salems Growing Piedmont Triad Research Park
10. Floridas Leading Fertility Center Announces Successful Baby Delivery via Egg Freezing
11. ZyGEM Teams With TATAA Biocenter To Distribute Its Innovative Nucleic acid Extraction Kits
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 01, 2016 , ... PhUSE will build on the ... US Single Day Events (SDE) to organize a multiple-day US conference. The first ... Topics of the pharmaceutical and life sciences industry will cover industry standards, data ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... Boston, MA (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... of Light Event on December 3rd, 2016. The event, which is held on ... NTI’s work with helping Americans with Disabilities back into the workplace. Suitable Technologies is ...
(Date:11/30/2016)...  GenomOncology today announced the appointment of Joshua F. ... Dr. Coleman will oversee clinical content development and ... The GenomOncology software suite empowers molecular pathologists with a seamless ... decision support, from quality control through reporting. ... , , ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... -  Equicare Health Inc ., the leading supplier of ... of the top 100 companies in the 2016 Global ... the top digital health companies across the globe.   ... year continually upgrading our product with the ongoing digital ... says Len Grenier , CEO of Equicare Health, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016  The American College of ... Trade Show Executive Magazine as one of the fastest-growing ... May 25-27 at the Bellagio in Las Vegas ... the highest percentage of growth in each of the following ... exhibiting companies and number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security ... solutions for the Biometric Exit Program. The Request for ... (CBP), explains that CBP intends to add biometrics to ... United States , in order to deter visa ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382209LOGO ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... -- Securus Technologies, a leading provider of civil ... investigation, corrections and monitoring announced that after exhaustive ... the final acceptance by all three (3) Department ... (MAS) installed. Furthermore, Securus will have contracts for ... October, 2016. MAS distinguishes between legitimate wireless device ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):