Navigation Links
Carbon molecule with a charge could be tomorrow's semiconductor
Date:9/8/2008

Blacksburg, Va. Virginia Tech chemistry Professor Harry Dorn has developed a new area of fullerene chemistry that may be the backbone for development of molecular semiconductors and quantum computing applications.

Dorn plays with the hollow carbon molecules known as fullerenes as if they are tinker toys. First, in 1999, he figured out how to put atoms inside the 80-atom molecule, then how to do it reliably, how to change the number of atoms forming the carbon cage, and how to change the number and kinds of atoms inside the cage, resulting in a new, more sensitive MRI material and a vehicle to deliver radioactive atoms for applications in nuclear medicine.

As part of the research to place gadolinium atoms inside the carbon cage for MRI applications, Dorn created 80-atom carbon molecule with two yttrium ions inside. Then he began to fool with the materials of the cage itself. He replaced one of the 80 atoms of carbon with an atom of nitrogen (providing Y2@C79N). This change leaves the nitrogen atom with an extra electron. Dorn discovered that the extra electron, instead of being on the nitrogen atom on the fullerene cage surface, ducks inside between the yttrium ions, forming a one-electron bond. "Basically, a very unusual one electron bond between two yttrium atoms," he said.

Discovery of this new class of stable molecules (M2@C79N ) was supported by computational studies by Daniel Crawford, associate professor of chemistry at Virginia Tech, and the structure was confirmed by x-ray crystallographic studies by Alan Balch , professor of chemistry at the University of California, Davis.

This research is reported in the September 6, 2008, online issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), in an article by Dorn and his colleagues at Virginia Tech and UC Davis.* The article does not speculate about potential applications, but Dorn does.

"No one has done anything like this," said Dorn. "Since the article was published, we now know that we can take the electron back out of the fullerene cage."

He says the discovery could be important to the new fields of spintronics, molecular electronics, and micro to nanoscale electronics, as well as the new field of quantum computing.

"The single electron bonded-diatomic yttrium has unique spin properties that can be altered. Increasing the polarization of this spin, could be important for improving the sensitivity of MRI and NMR, he said.

But more interesting are the electronic applications. "If we replace one of the carbon atoms with boron instead of nitrogen, we would be an electron short, instead of having an extra electron. Now you have the components of a semiconductor," Dorn said.

"I don't down whether it is important yet or not," he said. "People have been working on adding a nitrogen atom to standard 60-carbon fullerene."


'/>"/>

Contact: Susan Trulove
STrulove@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology technology :

1. Sheet of carbon atoms acts like a billiard table, physicists find
2. Sheet of carbon atoms acts like a billiard table, physicists find
3. Researchers measure carbon nanotube interaction
4. The sensitive side of carbon nanotubes: Creating powerful pressure sensors
5. NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers carbon nanotube manufacturing technology wins Nano 50 Award
6. Understanding of actuator properties of carbon nanotubes bring micro machines closer
7. Improved wettability of carbon nanotubes opens the door to new possibilities
8. Growing tiny carbon nanotube wires to connect computer chips of the future
9. Carbon nanotubes to be replaced by MoSIx nanowires in high-tech devices says new study
10. FED-TVs with carbon nanotube technology could supersede plasma and LCD flat screens
11. Clemson researcher studies carbon fibers for nuclear reactor safety
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/28/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 28, 2017 , ... ... the international market with three research projects accepted for presentation at the 33rd ... . Nearly 10,000 participants – including some of the world’s top thought leaders ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... June 27, 2017 , ... The recent vote by the ... a disease gives new hope to patients and hopefully sheds new light on the ... M.D. , an infertility expert and founding partner of Texas Fertility Center . ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... Iowa (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... ... technology license agreement whereby DuPont gains exclusive rights to the ERS patent portfolio ... ERS was formed to commercialize the foundational intellectual property (IP) of the CRISPR-Cas ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Biova, LLC., the leader in water ... Board of Directors. Dr. Henig will bring a wealth of scientific experience in the ... the Chief Technical and Scientific Officer of four major global companies in the last ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
(Date:4/5/2017)... -- Today HYPR Corp. , leading innovator in ... the HYPR platform is officially FIDO® Certified . ... that empowers biometric authentication across Fortune 500 enterprises and ... 15 million users across the financial services industry, however ... suites and physical access represent a growing portion of ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... NEW YORK , April 4, 2017   ... solutions, today announced that the United States Patent and ... The patent broadly covers the linking of an iris ... the same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... our latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will host ... hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in Redmond, ... on developing health and wellness apps that provide a ... Genome is the first hackathon for personal genomics ... companies in the genomics, tech and health industries are ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):