Navigation Links
Yeast Network Prevents Damage By Oxygen Radicals

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), or 'oxygen radicals', have been identified as major contributors to signs of premature aging, increased cancer prevalence linked to inflammation-associated syndromes and a variety of human diseases. Now scientists at the University of California, San Diego Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) have identified a key network of DNA repair and cell cycle control genes in yeast that prevents the deleterious effects of ROS.

"DNA repair and cell cycle control mechanisms are important guardians against cancerous changes in human cells," says Dr. Richard Kolodner, LICR Member and senior author of the study. "However, the effects of ROS on these cellular responses have not been well characterized. We've now identified a group of genes that cooperate to suppress DNA mutations and the genome rearrangements that are the hallmarks of cancer cells that occur in response to ROS."

Dr. Kolodner and lead author, Meng-Er Huang, generated various yeast strains each with a mutation in the TSA1 gene, which results in increased production of ROS, plus a mutation in one or more genes involved in DNA repair or cell cycle control. Cell survival and accumulation of DNA mutations and gross chromosomal rearrangements in each strain were then analysed to identify genes that cooperate to prevent the deleterious effects of ROS and promote normal cell survival.

"These results suggest that endogenous ROS-induced genome instability may contribute to cancer progression," says Dr. Kolodner, professor of medicine with UCSD School of Medicine and member of the Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center. "And increased ROS is almost certainly more harmful in cells with acquired mutations in other genes in the network. However the connections we've found might point to new strategies, like dietary supplements, that will alleviate some of the clinical symptoms of human diseases associated with genetic deficiencies of DNA damage respon ses."


'"/>

Source:Ludwig Institute For Cancer Research


Related biology news :

1. VCU Researchers Identify Networks Of Genes Responding To Alcohol In The Brain
2. Computational Method Speeds Mapping of Cell Signaling Networks
3. Active Vaccine Prevents Mice From Developing Prion Disease
4. Research Gives Hope For Liver Damage
5. Stem Cell Research Shows Potential for Replacing Tissue Damaged in Heart Attacks
6. South African Tribunal Asks For Damages Estimates in GSK AIDS Drug Case
7. New Look at DNA Hints at Origin of UV Damage
8. Plant hemoglobins: Oxygen handlers critical for nitrogen fixation
9. Oxygen increase caused mammals to triumph, researchers say
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert ... a media edge server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid ... software provided by Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the ... the NAB show at the Las Vegas ... ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 According to a new market ... Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, ... Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to ... of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 No two ... researchers at the New York University Tandon School ... Engineering have found that partial similarities between prints ... used in mobile phones and other electronic devices ... The vulnerability lies in the fact that ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... ... Bacterial biofilms, surface adherent communities of bacteria that are encased in a ... and catheter infections to gum disease and the rejection of medical implants. Though ... year, there is currently a paucity of means for preventing their formation or treating ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... ... ... Stratevi, a boutique firm that partners with healthcare companies to creatively develop and ... downtown Boston at 745 Atlantic Ave. , “We are seeing that even the ... value they provide, not just to patients, but also payers. Having a presence in ...
(Date:5/21/2017)... ... May 19, 2017 , ... Ovation Fertility scientists’ ... American Association of Bioanalysts (AAB) and the College of Reproductive Biology (CRB) today ... AAB’s commitment to excellence in clinical laboratory services and regulations. , “We ...
(Date:5/19/2017)... Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) , ... May 19, 2017 ... ... for its QED Proof-of-Concept Program. Academic researchers with technologies ripe for commercialization, ... Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, are encouraged to submit proposals. QED, now in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: