Navigation Links
Whole-genome study at Johns Hopkins reveals a new gene associated with abnormal heart rhythm

Using a new genomic strategy that has the power to survey the entire human genome and identify genes with common variants that contribute to complex diseases, researchers at Johns Hopkins, together with scientists from Munich, Germany, and the Framingham Heart Study, U.S.A., have identified a gene that may predispose some people to abnormal heart rhythms that lead to sudden cardiac death, a condition affecting more than 300 thousand Americans each year.

The gene called NOS1AP, not previously flagged by or suspected from more traditional gene-hunting approaches, appears to influence significantly one particular risk factor - the so-called QT interval length - for sudden cardiac death. The work will be published online at Nature Genetics on April 30.

"In addition to finding a genetic variant that could be of clinical value for sudden cardiac death, this study also demonstrates how valuable large-scale genomics studies can be in detecting novel biological targets," says the study's senior author, Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D., director of the McKusick-Nathans Institute for Genetic Medicine at Hopkins. "This study, conducted during the early days of a new technology, would have been impossible without the pioneering support of the D.W. Reynolds Foundation in their generous support of our clinical program in sudden cardiac death here at Hopkins."

QT interval measures the period of time it takes the heart to recover from the ventricular beat - when the two bottom chambers of the heart pump. Corresponding to the "lub" part of the "lub-dub" pattern of the heartbeat, an individual's QT interval remains constant. This interval is partly dependent on one's genetic constitution and, moreover, genes also play a role in sudden cardiac death.

"There's a great deal of evidence out there that having a too long or too short QT interval is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death," says the study's co-first author, Dan Arking, Ph.D., an instructor in the
'"/>

Source:Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Bioartificial kidney under study at MCG
2. W.M. Keck Foundation funds study of friendly microbes
3. Yellowstone microbes fueled by hydrogen, according to U. of Colorado study
4. Genome-wide mouse study yields link to human leukemia
5. Clam embryo study shows pollutant mixture adversely affects nerve cell development
6. New imaging method gives early indication if brain cancer therapy is effective, U-M study shows
7. Same mutation aided evolution in many fish species, Stanford study finds
8. Sequencing of marine bacterium will help study of cell communication
9. Genetically modified rice in China benefits farmers health, study finds
10. A new study examines how shared pathogens affect host populations
11. NYU study reveals how brains immune system fights viral encephalitis
Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014) Scientists at The New York ... step closer to creating a viable cell replacement ... cells. , For the first time, NYSCF ... from skin samples of patients with primary progressive ... protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food ... be a significant factor in the decline of many ... new study indicates that more than half of the ... raptors and hornbills., "By surveying not only the meat ... being eaten inside the forest by hunters and brought ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of ... history of life. But it may be reaching a ... literature and analysis of data published in Science ... loss and decline of animals is contributing to what ... sixth mass biological extinction event. , Since 1500, more ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients 2Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event 2Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event 3
... pay more for meals prepared with produce and meat ... meals actually increases when the price increases, according to ... of how customers perceive and value local food shows ... when they are priced slightly higher than meals made ...
... a poorly understood class of RNA produced in a mammal,s ... of the infection. Their findings are reported today in ... Microbiology. RNA (ribonucleic acid) contains information transcribed from the ... these RNAs translate sections of DNA code into building blocks ...
... New University of Florida research puts to rest the ... glacial period. It turns out it ended up in the ... findings have implications for modern-day global warming, said Ellen Martin, ... paper, which is published in this week,s journal Nature ...
Cached Biology News:Restaurant customers willing to pay more for local food 2New class of biomolecules triggered in response to respiratory virus infection 2New class of biomolecules triggered in response to respiratory virus infection 3New class of biomolecules triggered in response to respiratory virus infection 4UF research gives clues about carbon dioxide patterns at end of Ice Age 2UF research gives clues about carbon dioxide patterns at end of Ice Age 3
(Date:7/25/2014)... Pa. , July 25, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- ... and consulting for global corporations operating in highly ... host its first annual Global User Group Conference, ... historic Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at ... - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140724/130263 This ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... New York, NY - July 24, 2014 -- Keryx ... results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 ... ferric iron-based phosphate binder, for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia ... The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with ... the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Calif. , July 24, 2014  Now available ... to home. Rehealth Regenerative Therapies , located in ... and other physically active people a new health option: ... Regardless of age, countless patients suffer from joint ... activities, such as muscle tears, torn rotator cuff, tennis ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Security forces worldwide rely on sophisticated equipment, trained ... other public areas against terrorist attacks. A revolutionary ... about to make their job much easier. , ... Patolsky of Tel Aviv University ,s School of ... developed by the Herzliya company Tracense, picks up ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Xybion Announces It Will Host International User Conference in Philadelphia 2Xybion Announces It Will Host International User Conference in Philadelphia 3Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN 2Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN 3Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN 4Stem Cells In Sports Injuries, Joints And Muscular Pain 2Stem Cells In Sports Injuries, Joints And Muscular Pain 3Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs 2
... , , , ... became the only hospital in the Midwest to acquire a dual console ... States to purchase the new system. , , ... the latest robotic-assisted surgery system that gives surgeons an enhanced three-dimensional view ...
... , , , , ... Inc. (Nasdaq: RGDX ) announced today that it has entered ... Partnership to raise approximately $4 million from the private placement of 3,057,907 ... $1.30 per share. The closing of the sale of the shares occurred ...
... , , , ... (NYSE: ARE ), Landlord of Choice to the Life ... long-term lease with Eli Lilly and Company as the anchor tenant ... Science Park ("the Alexandria Center"). Lilly has leased approximately 91,000 ...
Cached Biology Technology:St. John's Hospital Acquires Latest Technology in Robotic-Assisted Surgery 2Response Genetics Announces $4 Million Private Placement 2Response Genetics Announces $4 Million Private Placement 3Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. Signs Biopharmaceutical Company, Lilly, as Anchor New York City Tenant at the Alexandria Center for Science and Technology 2Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. Signs Biopharmaceutical Company, Lilly, as Anchor New York City Tenant at the Alexandria Center for Science and Technology 3Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. Signs Biopharmaceutical Company, Lilly, as Anchor New York City Tenant at the Alexandria Center for Science and Technology 4
Screening assay to detect the Listeria monocytogenes in food samples by,DNA amplification and molecular hybridization on a microtiter plate....
... CopyControl™ vector can be induced prior to ... provide the stability of single-copy BACs with ... other cloning vectors. The kits provide the ... insert size screening system) necessary to create ...
... PCR Enhancer (with betaine) substantially improves ... and specificity for amplification of many ... in PCR eliminates the base-pair composition ... thermal stability, suppresses pauses of DNA ...
... Systems provide rapid, precise localization of ... frozen or paraffin-embedded tissue, cytospins and ... facilitate double or triple labeleing experiments, ... with primary antibodies of different animal ...
Biology Products: