Navigation Links
Viral hitchhiker inhibits Wolbachia bacteria's ability to proliferate

Scientists studying the widespread symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia have long been interested in its ability to proliferate. One way it does this is by hijacking sperm of its insect hosts and genetically tricking them to bear more infected females, the only sex that transmits the bacteria. Now, a new study from the MBL (Marine Biological Laboratory), published in the May 18 issue of PLoS Pathogens, demonstrates that a virus common to Wolbachia cells may be a key inhibitor of the cellular process that allows Wolbachia to manipulate insect reproduction.

Because Wolbachia are found in about 75 percent of the world's insects, the discovery could impact the development of virally delivered biocontrol tools for insects that transmit pathogens to humans or harm agriculture. It might also enable the design of alternative therapies for debilitating illnesses such as river blindness and elephantiasis, whose pathologies are caused by Wolbachia bacteria living in the parasitic worms associated with these diseases.

The new research, led by Seth Bordenstein, an Assistant Scientist in the MBL's Program in Global Infectious Diseases, shows that a virus known as WO-B interferes with Wolbachia's ability to cause cytoplasmic incompatibility, the reproductive manipulation of its insect host.

Until now, scientists believed the virus was somehow inducing this process. But viruses pirate cells to reproduce, often killing the cells as a result. So Bordenstein and his colleagues hypothesized that by preying on Wolbachia cells, the WO-B virus might reduce the incidence of cytoplasmic incompatibility in a host, not promote it.

Using DNA analysis and electron microscopy, the scientists quantified the number of WO-B viruses and Wolbachia cells in the testes of a common host: the fruit-fly-sized jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis. The researchers found that the virus was indeed associated with reduced bacterial growth. Then they bred the wasps and confirmed fe wer incidences of cytoplasmic incompatibility in relation to the reduced presence of the bacteria and increased presence of the virus.

"We're excited about these findings because there is a great deal of interest in deciphering the genetic and cytological mechanisms of cytoplasmic incompatibility," says Bordenstein. "We know very little about the virus, but understanding and using it may pave the way for future strategies to control insect-borne diseases."


Source:Marine Biological Laboratory

Related biology news :

1. Viral DNA sequence a possible trigger for breast cancer
2. NYU Study Reveals How Brains Immune System Fights Viral Encephalitis
3. Viral protein influences key cell-signaling pathway
4. Viral protein helps infected T cells stick to uninfected cells
5. Viral fitness explains different resistance patterns to aids drugs
6. Viral genetic differences are possible key to HIV dementia
7. Viral marker of human migration suspect
8. Viral protein is an effective preventative against infection
9. A virus-like hitchhiker may trigger bacterial meningitis
10. Novel antiviral technology inhibits RSV infection in mice
11. Researchers find molecule that inhibits regrowth of spinal nerve cells
Post Your Comments:

(Date:10/8/2015)... , 8. Oktober 2015 ... global tätiges Unternehmen des Bereiches Tracking, hat ... mit der Gefängnisbehörde Virginias (Department of Corrections ... elektronische Überwachungsdienste für alle Strafen geliefert werden, ... Cassell , Präsident für den Amerikanischen Kontinent ...
(Date:10/6/2015)... SAN MATEO, Calif. , Oct. 6, 2015 ... software company, today announced enhancements to its software ... gene expression analysis kit for differential expression in ... Analytic Platform, which is a cloud-based genomic analysis ... to advance scientific discovery from next-generation sequencing efforts. ...
(Date:9/30/2015)... 2015  The U.S. Court of Appeals for the ... in favor of Crossmatch ™, affirming the International ... Suprema and its U.S. partner Mentalix violated Section 337 ... that declares it unlawful to engage in "unfair practices" ... Crossmatch,s patents, the 5,900,993 patent and the 7,203,344 patent. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... Proove ... to announce their partnership with the Keck Medicine of the University of ... , The T.R.O.J.A.N. Study (Therapeutic Evaluation to Research Clinical Objectives Linking Genotypic and ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... Carolina (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2015 , ... Spirax ... announce the release of the CSM-C 600 compact clean steam generator . ... steam that meets the requirements of HTM2031, HTM2010, and EN285 standards. The CMS-C ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , October 12, 2015 cell ... 6.49 billion by 2022, according to a new report by ... attributed to rise in incidence of oncology diseases and other ... is expected to reach USD 6.49 billion by 2022, ... This growth in demand can be attributed to rise in ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... CAESAREA, Israel , October 12, 2015 ... of the Dario™ Diabetes Management Solution, today announced its ... a patient case study at MobiHealth,s 5th EAI ... Focused on, "Transforming healthcare through innovations in mobile and ... London, England from October 14 - ...
Breaking Biology Technology: