Navigation Links
UN successfully tests 'green' pesticide against locusts

A new method for manipulating macromolecules has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The technique uses double-stranded DNA to direct the behavior of other molecules.

In previous DNA nanotechnology efforts, duplex DNA has been used as a static lattice to construct geometrical objects in three dimensions. Instead of manipulating DNA alone into such shapes, the researchers are using DNA to control the folding and resulting structure of RNA. Eventually, they envision building supramolecular machines whose inner workings are governed by twisted strands of DNA.

In a paper that has been accepted for publication in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, and posted on its Web site, Silverman and graduate student Chandrasekhar Miduturu begin with a piece of unfolded RNA. Through specific chemical reactions, they attach two strands of DNA, each resembling one side of a ladder. The two DNA strands spontaneously bind together, then the researchers add magnesium ions to initiate folding of the RNA.

"Folding of the RNA structure competes with formation of the DNA constraint until a chemical balance is reached," Silverman said. "In some cases, the DNA is like a barnacle, just stuck onto the RNA without perturbing its structure. In other cases, the DNA changes the RNA structure. We can predict which situation will occur based on the shape of the RNA and on the attachment points of the DNA constraint."

In cases where the normal RNA shape and the DNA constraint cannot co-exist simultaneously, the balance between competing RNA and DNA structures is controlled by the concentration of magnesium ions, Silverman said.

In work not yet published, the researchers have also shown that the effects of the DNA constraint on the RNA structure can be modulated by external stimuli such as DNA oligonucleotide strands, protein enzymes and chemical reagents.

While Silverman and Miduturu are currently usi ng RNA as a proof of principle for their DNA constraint studies, they also plan to use the new technique to more effectively study the folding process of RNA. Because they can control RNA structure precisely, they could generate and examine biologically relevant folded and misfolded RNAs. They could also hook the DNA constraints to other molecules, including non-biological macromolecules, to control their folding.

Importantly, the process of manipulating macromolecules with DNA constraints can be either reversible or irreversible, depending on which chemical trigger is used. Like a switch, a particular molecular shape could be turned on and off.

"Another key aspect of DNA constraints is their programmability," Silverman said. "By placing two or more constraints on one molecule, we could generate multiple molecular states that would be programmable by DNA sequence. In other efforts, we would like to control macroscopic assembly processes by influencing the shapes of self-assembling molecular components."


'"/>

Source:


Related biology news :

1. New, automated tool successfully classifies and relates proteins in unprecedented way
2. Biomarkers isolated from saliva successfully predict oral and breast cancer
3. Stem cell therapy successfully treats heart attack in animals
4. Mad cow proteins successfully detected in blood
5. Israeli scientists successfully transplant frozen-thawed ovaries in sheep
6. Magnetic probe successfully tracks implanted cells in cancer patients
7. Transgenic plants remove more selenium from polluted soil than wild plants, new tests show
8. Human trial proves ricin vaccine safe, induces neutralizing antibodies; further tests planned
9. Free HIV tests cheaper than charging when goal is preventing AIDS
10. Embryo tests give parents the choice
11. Chemical tests of cell growth enter third dimension
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/2/2017)... YORK , Feb. 2, 2017  EyeLock LLC, ... released a new white paper " What You Should ... The problem of ensuring user authenticity is a growing ... the authentication of users. However, traditional authentication schemes such ... Biometric authentication offers an elegant solution ...
(Date:1/26/2017)... -- Crossmatch, a leading provider of security and identity management ... fraud, waste and abuse in assistance operations around the ... Disaster Relief conference in Panama City ... foreign assistance organizations throughout Latin America ... largely unacknowledged problem in the foreign assistance and disaster ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... Jan. 23, 2017  The latest mobile market research ... have dropped dramatically. The quarterly average price of a ... $276 in Q4 2016.  There are now 120 sub-$150 ... $116, up from just 28 a year ago at ... to Maxine Most , Acuity Market Intelligence Principal, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... Chef Jodi Abel has returned from her three-week tour through the ... a number of delicious recipes and new techniques to share with her Lajollacooks4u guests. ... province. It is internationally renowned for its incredible wine farms, beautiful environment, boutiques ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017  Driven by consumers, ... are now the fastest growing categories, finds the ... Actives in Personal Care: Multi-regional Market Analysis and ... management consulting firm Kline. "Biotechnology actives ... make them more effective for skin and hair ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Pa., Feb. 24, 2017  VWR Corporation (NASDAQ: VWR), the ... laboratory and production customers, today reported its financial results for ... Highlights: 4Q16 record quarterly ... 1.0% on an organic basis. ... an organic basis, while the Americas net sales increased 2.5%, ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... BellBrook Labs ... to include an array of biochemical analyses critical for Lead Discovery. The ... hit-to-lead and SAR programs, including inhibitor potency and selectivity, mechanism of action, and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: