Navigation Links
U of MN uses robotic surgery techniques in cardiac cell therapy research

Researchers at the University of Minnesota were successful in using robotic surgery to deliver stem cell treatment to damaged heart tissue in pigs.

Using minimally invasive robotic surgery equipment, researchers injected the stem cells into the damaged hearts. The cells were "labeled" with iron particles so that researchers would be able to see if they engrafted in the pig hearts.

The cells were successfully transplanted in six of seven cases. Subsequent MRI studies showed that the cells took hold in the heart and function improved.

The team used a combination of skeletal myoblasts, or cells that give rise to muscle, and bone-marrow derived cells. Both cell types have been shown to improve the development of new blood vessels and to improve function of injured heart muscle. Both are in human clinical trials as well.

The research is published in the current issue of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

Once more animal studies are completed, the technique could be applied in human clinical trials.

"In people with heart failure, open surgery can be risky; finding a minimally invasive technique to deliver cell therapy to the damaged cardiac tissue would reduce the risk to patients," said Doris A. Taylor, Ph.D., professor of Physiology, holder of the Medtronic Bakken Chair in Cardiovascular Repair, and co-leader of the study.

The minimally invasive approach would offer several benefits for people in heart failure, Taylor said. It is less dangerous to the patient. It can be done while the heart is still beating, and requires less time under anesthesia. It also offers surgeons a magnified view of the heart and allows them to target the cell infusion more precisely.

Harald Ott, M.D., co-leader of this study, now a surgery resident at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, pointed out, "Currently these types of cell therapies, in which stem cells are injected into damaged hearts, are only available to people who are enrolled in clinical research trials."

Skeletal and bone marrow cells that are injected into damaged heart tissue have been shown to improve function in the left ventricle, the chamber of the heart that pumps blood into the aorta, the main artery through which oxygen-rich blood flows from the heart to the body.

Taylor said more research needs to be done to determine which types of cells are most beneficial to infuse into damaged hearts, as well as if the minimally invasive technique can deliver similar results as traditional open surgery. "But that is what keeps us busy," she added," finding the best treatment for patients with heart disease."


'"/>

Source:University of Minnesota


Related biology news :

1. 3-D ultrasound scanner could guide robotic surgeries
2. Rare surgery performed to remove pancreas, prevent diabetes
3. Scalpel-free surgery could reduce risk of HIV and hepatitis exposure for health care workers
4. 3D ultrasound device poised to advance minimally invasive surgery
5. For one Stanford doctor, the beat goes on during open-heart surgery
6. Unique equine cataract surgery offered on routine basis
7. Cheaper and simpler keyhole surgery
8. Robot assisted surgery more accurate than conventional surgery
9. New biologic treatment for tennis elbow may replace surgery for chronic sufferers
10. Jefferson scientists find high glucose before surgery raises risk of dangerous complications
11. Successful lung cancer surgery not enough to break nicotine dependence in many smokers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/15/2016)... and BADEN-BADEN, Germany , December ... leading global financial services provider, today announced an agreement with ... behavioural biometrics, to join forces. The partnership will enable clients ... strategies in compliance with local data protection regulation. ... In order to ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... Advancements in biometrics will radically ... wellbeing (HWW), and security of vehicles by ... vehicles begin to feature fingerprint recognition, iris ... monitoring, brain wave monitoring, stress detection, fatigue ... detection. These will be driven by built-in, ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... CLEVELAND , Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers ... commercial possibilities for graphene by combining the material ... a highly sensitive pressure detector able to sense ... of a small spider.  The ... and can be read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/24/2017)...  Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: AST), a ... today announced positive efficacy results from the company,s ... additional motor function improvement at 6-months and 9-months ... AIS-A patients with complete cervical spinal cord injuries ... function is critically important to patients with complete ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... USA & Geneva, Switerland (PRWEB) , ... January ... ... to announce the first commercially available malaria Plasmodium falciparum culture panels with standard ... falciparum culture panels, which are available in a range of concentrations from six ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... Oklahoma City based Sigma Blood ... for the firm’s PERFEQTA software and legacy product QC Manager 2.0. , Sigma ... team at CJBC and thrilled that they have decided to implement PERFEQTA and QC ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... - BioAmber Inc. (NYSE: BIOA ) today announced ... Rodman & Renshaw, a unit of H.C. Wainwright ... representative of several underwriters, under which the underwriters have ... minimum of 2,105,264 shares of common stock of the ... 1,052,632 shares of common stock of the Company with ...
Breaking Biology Technology: