Navigation Links
Two chemicals boost immune cells' ability to fight HIV without gene therapy

A UCLA AIDS Institute study has discovered that two chemical compounds may help the immune systems of HIV-infected persons fight the disease without invasive gene therapy. Presented March 5 at the 2005 Palm Springs Symposium on HIV/AIDS, the new research demonstrates that the new chemicals activate telomerase -- a protein that boosts immune cells' ability to divide, enabling them to continue destroying HIV-infected cells.

"The immune cells that fight HIV naturally produce telomerase during the infection's early phase, but stop once HIV becomes a chronic condition," explained Rita Effros, Ph.D., Plott Endowed Chair in Gerontology and a professor of pathology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. "The two compounds switched telomerase back on in the cells."

In earlier research, the UCLA team showed that inserting the telomerase gene into the immune cells of an HIV-infected person prevented the cells from aging prematurely. The telomerase enabled the immune cells to divide indefinitely, stimulated their production of a viral-fighting molecule and prolonged their power to kill HIV-infected cells.

In this study, the scientists isolated immune cells from the blood of HIV-infected persons and cultured the cells with the chemical compounds. They were surprised to see that the compounds produced the same three changes in the cells as those created by the gene therapy.

"Lo and behold, we discovered we didn't need to use gene therapy to reactivate the telomerase and strengthen the immune system's capacity to stave off HIV," said Effros, a member of the UCLA AIDS Institute. "We were thrilled to see we could create the same changes in the cells without relying on an invasive procedure."

Immune cells that battle HIV must constantly divide in order to continue performing their protective functions. The massive amount of division prematurely shortens these cells' ends, or telomeres, ultimately exhausting the immune system.

UC LA's previous research shows that telomerase rejuvenates the telomeres and allows the immune cells to remain youthful and active as they replicate under HIV's attack. Drugs that activate telomerase also offer therapeutic potential for a wide spectrum of degenerative diseases and chronic conditions in which cellular aging plays a role.

"I'm really excited by our findings. This progress moves us one step closer to drugs that work by switching telomerase on permanently and keeping the immune cells young and strong in their fight against infection," said Effros. "These therapies are also easier to develop than gene-therapy drugs."

The research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a University of California Discovery Grant. Geron provided additional funding and the chemical compounds for use in the laboratory.

Effros' team included doctoral student Steven Fauce; Beth Jamieson, Ph.D., assistant professor hematology-oncology; and Otto Yang, Ph.D., associate professor of infectious diseases, all from UCLA.


'"/>

Source:UCLA


Related biology news :

1. Harmful chemicals may reprogram gene response to estrogen
2. Pittsburgh researchers discover that certain chemicals in the blood may indicate brain injury
3. A silent pandemic: Industrial chemicals are impairing the brain development of children worldwide
4. Enhancing activity of marijuana-like chemicals in brain helps treat
5. Combination therapy boosts effectiveness of telomere-directed cancer cell death
6. Crickets finicky mating behavior boosts biodiversity
7. Genome study of beneficial microbe may help boost plant health
8. Lance Armstrong through a physiological lens: hard training boosts muscle power 8%
9. Discovery of T-cell traffic control boosts new drug promise
10. New plant DNA libraries provides massive boost to worlds plant researchers
11. Good news for the medical marijuana movement: pot proliferates brain cells and boosts mood
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/13/2016)... --> --> ... report titled - Biometric Sensors Market - Global Industry Analysis, ... to the report, the global biometric sensors market was valued at ... US$1,625.8 mn by 2023, expanding at a CAGR of ... the biometric sensors market is expected to reach 1,799.6 ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... , Jan. 11, 2016  higi, the ... nearly 10,000 retail locations, web and mobile, today ... $40 million from existing investors. ... be devoted to further innovate higi,s health platform ... and web portal – including expanding services and ...
(Date:1/7/2016)... NEW YORK , Jan. 7, 2016 ... as regional markets for biometric technologies and devices, identifying ... application market for various types of biometric devices. Includes ... report to: Identify newer markets and explore the ... of biometric devices. Examine each type of biometric technology, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... MA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... is now available on Microsoft Azure. On Azure, Arvados provides capabilities for managing ... saw clear demand for Microsoft Azure from major institutions collecting and analyzing genomic ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... With a presidential election in November ... Business Conference will bring together over 500 top healthcare leaders for a night and ... The conference, organized by MBA students of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, will ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... Clinovo , the ... validated Electronic Data Capture (EDC) system ClinCaptureand its new Contract Research Organization (CRO) ... 2016 Conference in San Mateo, California on February 10th and 11th. Watch ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... 2016 , ... PharmApprove announced today the hiring ... for Rare Disorders (NORD). Dorman will lead PharmApprove efforts to work with patients, ... drug regulatory review process. , “Adding Diane Dorman is just the latest in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: