Navigation Links
Tumor cells evade death through autophagy

Autophagy is a cellular process that enables cells to turnover their contents, something that they do frequently. Autophagy is initiated in tumor cells by chemotherapy and radiation, but it is not known if this contributes to tumor cell death or helps tumor cells survive the anti-cancer therapy. However, in a study using a mouse model of B cell lymphomas, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that autophagy represents a survival mechanism for tumor cells treated with agents that initiate tumor cell death by a process known as apoptosis.

In the study, which appears online on January 18 in advance of publication in the February print issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Craig Thompson and colleagues show that in a tumor in which apoptosis was induced by activation of p53 expression, autophagy was observed only in tumor cells not undergoing apoptosis. If mice were unable to initiate autophagy, increased numbers of tumor cells undergoing apoptosis were detected. Furthermore, if these mice were treated with the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide, tumor cell apoptosis and tumor regression was increased and tumor recurrence was substantially delayed. This study has clinical implications as it indicates that adjunct treatment with inhibitors of autophagy might increase the efficacy of apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutics in human patients with cancer.


'"/>

Source:Journal of Clinical Investigation


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Missing Receptor Molecule Causes Tumor Growth
2. Stem Cells Found In Cerebellum; Possible Cell of Origin for Childhood Brain Tumors
3. New Therapeutic Target Identified In Inherited Brain Tumor Disorder
4. Tumor cells that border normal tissue are told to leave
5. Tumor wizardry wards off attacks from the immune system
6. Tumor-suppressor gene is critical for placenta development
7. Wisconsin scientists grow critical nerve cells
8. Spleen may be source of versatile stem cells
9. Researchers discover way to make cells in the eye sensitive to light
10. Priming embryonic stem cells to fulfill their promise
11. Lack of enzyme turns fat cells into fat burners
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/15/2018)... YORK (PRWEB) , ... September 14, 2018 , ... ... of “Rare Diseases." This campaign will showcase the innovative work being done within ... as potential future therapies for those living with rare diseases. ...
(Date:9/12/2018)... JUPITER, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... September 12, 2018 ... ... elegant and intuitive spine fusion solutions announced today it has received 510(k) clearance ... Tab Pedicle Screw complementing its TowerLOX® MIS Pedicle Screw System. , TowerLOX-EXT MIS ...
(Date:9/1/2018)... ... ... is hard at work on his second ocean crossing. After becoming the first human to ... to San Francisco, churning his limbs eight hours a day in the cold Pacific for ... its kind, The Swim is far more than just an extreme sport. Besides the gruelling ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/31/2018)... , ... August 30, 2018 , ... Small, wireless and ... are slimming down and getting connected, too. Draper’s latest system is tiny in size, ... abilities. , A driving factor in the new implant design is the growing awareness ...
(Date:8/29/2018)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... August 28, 2018 , ... ... will be presenting the results of a safety study performed on an allogeneic ... North American Veterinary Regenerative Medicine Association (NAVRMA) conference in September. He is ...
(Date:8/26/2018)... , ... August 24, 2018 , ... ... that stem cell-derived exosomes dramatically relieves atopic dermatitis and inhibits a variety of ... According to the paper, the symptoms of mice having severe atopic dermatitis were ...
(Date:8/21/2018)... Conn. (PRWEB) , ... August 21, 2018 , ... The ... 40, an annual recognition of the fastest growing technology companies in Connecticut. This year’s ... be held on Wednesday, October 3, at the Connecticut Convention Center in Hartford. A ...
Breaking Biology Technology: