Navigation Links
Stroke treatment a step closer after trial

A potential new treatment for stroke has taken a major step forward following promising results from the first clinical trial.

Researchers at The University of Manchester have shown in laboratory studies that a naturally occurring protein called IL-1ra protects brain cells from injury and death.

The team, led by Professor Nancy Rothwell and Dr Pippa Tyrrell, have now reported the results of the first small trial of IL-1ra in patients, which are published in the Journal of Neurology and Neuropsychiatry.

"The study was designed to test if IL-1ra is safe in stroke patients and showed promising results," said Professor Rothwell, a world-renowned neuroscientist based in the University's Faculty of Life Sciences.

"The trial was a definite step in the right direction and may lead to a full trial to test its effectiveness next year."

Stroke is the UK's third biggest killer and the biggest cause of disability, affecting 100,000 people each year. It accounts for 6.5% of total NHS and social services expenditure and there are currently no treatments available.

Stroke occurs when vessels supplying blood to the brain become blocked and the brain is starved of oxygen. A core area of the brain dies within minutes but it is the threatened area around this core that the treatment may help to salvage.

"The protein targets the molecule that causes inflammation and dramatically reduces the inflammatory markers," said Professor Rothwell, MRC Research Professor and the University's Vice-President for Research.

"In the laboratory we were able to reduce damage to the cells by as much as half; if we could cut cell damage in patients by even a third it would be a very significant step forward in treating stroke."

IL-1ra (interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) is the naturally occurring antagonist of the protein interleukin-1 (IL-1), which the same scientists have shown to cause damage to the brain in experimental stroke and b rain injury.

IL-1ra is currently used to manage rheumatoid arthritis but, as a long-term treatment, the cost is prohibitive. With stroke, the drug would have to be administered within the first few critical hours through an infusion over a short period of time, perhaps as little as three days.

Dr Tyrrell, who is based at Hope Hospital in Salford, added: "Stroke is a devastating condition that affects many thousand of people so the development of any effective treatment would have enormous benefits to the patients I see and to their families.

"We still have quite a long way to go before we can be sure if this will be an effective treatment but the results so far are very encouraging."

The trial was co-funded by the University, the charity Research into Ageing and the Medical Research Council.

Dr Lorna Layward, Research Manager of Research into Ageing, a special trust within Help the Aged, said: "This is an exciting breakthrough in which we're extremely proud to have played a part.

"There is a desperate need for treatment of stroke, which has a devastating impact for those affected and their families.

"While this treatment is still some way off being available to patients, it is definitely a huge step in the right direction."


'"/>

Source:University of Manchester


Related biology news :

1. Mystery Blood Vessel Disorder Implicated In Mini Strokes
2. Stroke symptoms common among general population
3. Protein discovery could unlock the secret to better TB treatment
4. Topical treatment shown to inhibit HIV and herpes simplex virus infection
5. Weizmann Institute scientists develop a new approach for directing treatment to metastasized prostate cancer in the bones.
6. Researchers add new tool to tumor-treatment arsenal
7. Potential treatments for neurofibromatosis
8. Nanoparticles offer new hope for detection and treatment
9. Technique may allow cancer patients to freeze eggs, preserving fertility before starting treatment
10. PET/CT can identify new cancer lesions at early stage, allowing for prompt treatment
11. New understanding of DNA repair may pave way to cancer treatments
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/14/2016)... , Allemagne, March 14, 2016 ... ) - --> - Renvoi : image ... --> --> ... biométriques, fournit de nouveaux lecteurs d,empreintes digitales pour ... de DERMALOG sera utilisé pour produire des cartes ...
(Date:3/10/2016)... 10, 2016   Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS ... (CBP) is testing its biometric identity solution at the ... to help identify certain non-U.S. citizens leaving the country. ... designed to help determine the efficiency and accuracy of using ... and will run until May 2016. --> ...
(Date:3/8/2016)... March 8, 2016   Valencell , the ... announced it has secured $11M in Series D ... a new venture fund being launched by UAE-based ... from existing investors TDF Ventures and WSJ Joshua ... continue its triple-digit growth and accelerate its pioneering ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... ... Doctors in Italy, Japan, the UK and the US have reached some surprising ... its link to malignant mesothelioma. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted the details of their ... , The studies analyzed for the new report included more than 3,447 cancer patients. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... NEW YORK , May 26, 2016 ... announced today that it will be a featured presenter at ... 2016 in New York City at ... Denis Corin , Q BioMed Inc. CEO, is scheduled ... presentation will cover the company,s business strategy, recent developments and ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Lajollacooks4u has become a rising hotspot ... rated one of its top attractions. Fortune 500 companies, such as Illumina, Hewlett-Packard, ... unique and intimate team-building experience. , Each event kicks off with an olive oil ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , ... May 25, 2016 , ... Scientists at the ... options being tried for mesothelioma may be hampering the research that could lead to ... Click here to read it now. , The team evaluated 98 ...
Breaking Biology Technology: