Navigation Links
Some people would give life or limb not to be fat

Nearly half of the people responding to an online survey about obesity said they would give up a year of their life rather than be fat, according to a study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale.

The 4,000 respondents in varying numbers between 15% and 30% also said they would rather walk away from their marriage, give up the possibility of having children, be depressed, or become alcoholic rather than be obese. Five percent and four percent, respectively, said they would rather lose a limb or be blind than be overweight.

"We were surprised by the sheer number of people who reported they would be willing to make major sacrifices to avoid being obese. It drives home the message that weight bias is powerful and pervasive," said Marlene Schwartz, associate director of the Rudd Center and lead author of the study in Obesity, which was issued this month.

In addition to these comments, the study assessed implicit and explicit, or unconscious and conscious, negative attitudes about obesity. The data was collected from a web site developed for the purpose of the study. People found out about the website by attending a conference, reading articles in which one of the authors was interviewed, or by visiting the Rudd Center website. Of those who responded, three percent were underweight, 41 percent were normal weight, 21 percent were overweight, 21 percent were obese and 14 percent were extremely obese.

Implicit attitudes were measured with a timed word categorization task that measured how quickly the respondents associated words like "bad" and "lazy" with "fat people" compared with "thin people." Explicit weight bias was assessed by asking people to rate their preferences for thin and fat people, and the degree to which they believe that fat people are lazier than thin people.

The researchers found that people of all weight categories exhibited a significant implicit anti-fat bias. Thinner people held stronger implici t and explicit negative attitudes than heavier people. Obese and very obese people exhibited only an implicit anti-fat bias, not an explicit one.

"The fact that even obese individuals exhibited a significant implicit anti-fat bias is important because it suggests that they have internalized negative stereotypes, such as believing they are lazy," said Schwartz. "Based on research about the importance of believing in your ability to succeed at a difficult task, we predict that internalizing weight bias contributes to feelings of desperation, shame, and withdrawal, rather than motivates healthy behavior changes."


'"/>

Source:Yale University


Related biology news :

1. New insight into people who see colors in letters and numbers
2. Antiretroviral therapy may prevent excess risk of some cancers in people with HIV
3. Increased risk of osteoporosis associated with gene that one in five people have
4. Exercise training in ordinary people affects the activity of 500 genes
5. Brain activity related to processing faces is similar in people with, without autism
6. Newly identified mechanism helps explain why people of African descent are more vulnerable to TB
7. Less antibiotic use in food animals leads to less drug resistance in people, study shows
8. Nearly half of people who need cholesterol treatment dont get it
9. Obese people are more sensitive to pain, suggests study
10. Slow-frozen people? Latest research supports possibility of cyropreservation
11. Carnegie Mellon researchers discover key deficiencies in brains of people with autism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/2/2016)... YORK , Feb. 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... facilities are primarily focused on medical screening ... measure point-of-care parameters. Wearable devices that facilitate ... user,s freedom of movement are being bolstered ... for human biomedical signal acquisition coupled with ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... --Technology Enhancements Accelerate Growth of X-ray Imaging This ... computed radiography markets in Thailand , ... (TIM). It provides an in-depth analysis of ... regional market drivers and restraints. The study offers revenue ... attractiveness, both for digital and computed radiography. Market participants ...
(Date:2/1/2016)... Canada , February 1, 2016 ... technological advancements to drive global touchfree intuitive gesture control ... --> Rising sales of consumer electronics coupled ... gesture control market size through ... consumer electronics coupled with new technological advancements to drive ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Reichert Technologies, ... continues today to pursue the highest level of accuracy and quality with the ... Refractometer and the AR5 Refractometer. Accurate, reliable and tough enough for the ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... , ... Global Stem Cells Group, has announced ... new facility will provide advanced protocols and state-of-the-art techniques in cellular medicine, focusing ... The new GSCG clinic is headed by four prominent Ecuadorian physicians, including Pablo ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... 10, 2016 Early-career researchers from ... Peru , Uganda and Yemen ... health and nutrition   Indonesia , ... and Yemen are being honored for their ... are also celebrated for mentoring young women scientists who are pursuing careers ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb. 10, 2016 NX Prenatal Inc., a ... NeXosome® technology for early warning of adverse pregnancy ... recent study by Dr. Thomas McElrath ... Maternal Fetal Medicine,s (SMFM) annual meeting held in ... , 2016.  The presentation reported initial positive top-line ...
Breaking Biology Technology: