Navigation Links
Smashing the time it takes to repair our bones

New research by Queensland University of Technology is helping scientists better understand how bone cells work and may one day lead to the development of technology that can speed up the time it takes to heal fractured and broken bones.

QUT recent graduate Dr Gwynne Hannay has built a gadget capable of promoting bone cell formation in the laboratory.

Dr Hannay said his device replicated the mechanical and electrical stimulants which occurred naturally in the body to repair fractured and broken bones.

"This device is about trying to grow bone tissue in the same environment our body grows bones. I have taken bone cells and put them in the physical environment they would experience in the body, and then varied the stimulants to extract a beneficial environment for tissue growth," he said.

Dr Hannay's research has advanced the understanding of how bone cells can be stimulated to heal factures and has for the first time combined the artificial reproduction of both mechanical and electrical stimulants.

"Previous research has looked at both of these stimulants individually, but not together, neglecting the fact that both are occurring in normal healthy bone during fracture healing"

He said by combining the two stimulants, a synergistic effect was produced.

"That means when you apply both the mechanical and electrical stimulants together a result greater than the sum of the two stimulants applied individually is achieved. It creates a greater output," he said.

Dr Hannay said that unfortunately when bones fractured or broke, especially in older people, the healing process could stall.

"We find bones can get half way through the healing process but won't heal properly and with an aging population this is a growing problem for orthopaedic surgeons to accommodate and one that is not easily solved with current methodologies," he said.

"In the future we might be able to make a device utilising these combined stimulants that could be attached to the body and help heal the bone."

Additionally, normal fractures that would otherwise heal successfully could be accelerated with the use of these stimulants.

Dr Hannay said normal fractures in young, healthy people took approximately six to eight weeks to heal.

"It might be possible to significantly reduce the healing time. That would be the goal."

Dr Hannay graduated from QUT with a PhD from the Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering.
'"/>

Source:Queensland University of Technology


Related biology news :

1. NJIT Presidential Award winner takes stem cell research another step
2. Unique library of plant genes germinates, takes root at UNC
3. New influenza vaccine takes weeks to mass produce
4. Oops! Researchers publish new findings on the brains response to costly mistakes
5. Blood flow in brain takes a twist, affecting views of Alzheimers
6. HIV vaccine takes different tack to boosting immune response
7. Taking evolutions temperature: Researchers pinpoint the energy it takes to make a species
8. For Stanford scientists, RNAi gene therapy takes two steps forward, one step back
9. Pitt phage hunter takes on tuberculosis
10. The brain, traffic and nano-circuits -- e-Science takes on major challenges
11. Diabetes research takes wing thanks to long-lived fruit fly

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/9/2016)... 2016 Vigilant Solutions announces today that an agency ... develop a lead in a difficult homicide case. The agency ... locate the suspect vehicle. Due to the ongoing investigation, the ... omitted at the agency,s request. --> ... victim was found deceased at an intersection here in the ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... February 3, 2016 --> ... research report "Automated Fingerprint Identification System Market by Component ... Application (Banking & Finance, Government, Healthcare, and Transportation) and ... the market is expected to be worth USD 8.49 ... between 2015 and 2020. The transformation and technology evolution ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016 Checkpoint Inhibitors ... Rising Market Are you interested in the ... revenues for checkpoint inhibitors. Visiongain,s report gives those ... product and national level. Avoid falling behind ... progress, opportunities and revenues those emerging cancer therapies ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... new stem cell treatment clinic in Quito, Ecuador. The new facility will provide ... applications to patients from around the world. , The new GSCG clinic ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ASAE is introducing a hybrid membership model ... the option of joining or renewing through an organizational ... staff size, every employee in any size association or ... all available member benefits.   John H. ... options will allow organizations of any size and their ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Benchmark Research, a fully-integrated network of ... principal investigators (PI) to the roles of Chief Medical Officer, Clinical Research and ... Chu, a Benchmark Research PI in the Austin office, will assume the role ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... now available on Microsoft Azure. On Azure, Arvados provides capabilities for managing and ... clear demand for Microsoft Azure from major institutions collecting and analyzing genomic data,” ...
Breaking Biology Technology: