Navigation Links
Shark attack worries? Driving to the beach is more deadly

Which is more likely to happen - you being in a car wreck or being bitten by a shark?

Those who answered that cars are greater killers win a free trip to the beach. It's really no contest, says a Texas A&M University professor. Your chances of being in a wreck are far greater than being a shark's lunch, says John McEachran, a professor of wildlife and fishery sciences who has studied sharks for years.

Worldwide, about one million people a year are killed in auto accidents, including more than 42,000 a year in the United States.

McEachran goes on to note that far more people die each year - about 90 worldwide - from an allergic reaction to eating peanuts.

Despite several attacks in Florida recently - one that killed a 14-year-old girl - shark attacks remain very rare when you put it all into perspective, McEachran believes.

"There are millions of people in the water at any given moment of the day," he notes.

"When you consider all of the people in the water at the same time, the number of shark attacks is very, very remote. Your chances of winning the lottery are greater than being attacked by a shark.

"But when a shark attack does occur, it makes big headlines. The drive you will make to the beach is far more dangerous, but an auto accident that kills several people will not make big headlines across the U.S. But a shark attack on one person will."

According to the International Shark Attack File, only seven fatalities occurred worldwide due to shark attack in 2004, there were only four in 2003, and only three in 2002.

Florida, with its large coastline and warm waters, leads all states with an average of about 30 shark attacks per year, followed by California (6), Texas (4), Hawaii (3), North Carolina (2) and Alabama, South Carolina and Oregon each reporting one.

McEachran says shark attacks are far less frequent causes of injury than driving, boating and diving accidents.

He says when most attacks occur, they happen in 3 to 4 feet of water. "But often, that can mean you're several hundred feet away from the beach," he notes. "Also, most attacks occur in water that is murky and not very clear.

"A greater percentage of beachgoers are injured by jellyfish, stingrays or hardhead and gafftop fishes, which have poisonous spines. They are more likely to cause harm than a shark."

He says when shark attacks occur, often they are accidental.

"Humans are not a shark's preferred food choice," he says.

"They don't regard the human shape as a prey item. Sometimes you hear reports of surfers having their boards hit by a shark, and it's probably because the board resembles the shape of a seal, which is a prime food source for sharks."

McEachran says some common sense can go a long way in avoiding contact with sharks.

"Sharks generally don't like to be around people," he adds.

"Most people are safe at the beach. To put your mind at ease, go to a beach that has lifeguards. They should be looking for possible sharks.

"Shark attacks are like airplane crashes," he notes. "The vast majority of airplane trips are safe, but when a crash occurs, it gets big headlines. If you use some good common sense in the water, you should be fine."


'"/>

Source:Texas A&M University


Related biology news :

1. Shark skin saves naval industry money
2. Poplar trees redirect resources in response to simulated attack
3. Genetically modified natural killer immune cells attack, kill leukemia cells
4. Genetic defects give the immune system the green light to attack the pancreas
5. Columbia study shows widely used artery clearing device does not help patients during heart attack
6. Stem cell therapy successfully treats heart attack in animals
7. New insights into how Huntingtons disease attacks the brain
8. Ibruprofen and other commonly used painkillers for treating inflammation may increase the risk of heart attack
9. Researchers propose measures to curb lion attacks in Tanzania
10. License to kill enables powerful immune attack cells in mice
11. Bone marrow stem cells may heal hearts even years after heart attacks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/7/2016)... to a new market research report "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market by Technology ... End User, And Region - Global Forecast to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... USD 36.07 Billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... 2016   Avanade is helping Williams Martini ... in history, exploit biometric data in order to critically ... the competitive edge against their rivals after their impressive, ... Avanade has worked with Williams during the 2016 season ... (heart rate, breathing rate, temperature and peak acceleration) for ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... Dec. 6, 2016  Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and ... an offering of €500.0 million principal amount of its 1.414% ... of its 2.425% senior unsecured notes due 2026. ... on December 13, 2016, subject to the satisfaction of customary closing ... The Company intends to use ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016  Biotheranostics today ... the role of the Breast Cancer Index (BCI) ... breast cancer are most at-risk for disease recurrence ... include results from three studies advancing the understanding ... related to tumor biology and inform decisions related ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Opal Kelly, a leading ... interconnect using USB or PCI Express, announced the FOMD-ACV-A4, the company's first FPGA-on-Module ... small, thin, SODIMM-style module that fits a standard 204-pin SODIMM socket for low-cost ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... bioInformatics portal. In response to client demand KbioBox developed a sophisticated “3 click” ... program. Both are accessible from KBioBox’s new website, https://www.kbiobox.com/ and ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016  Soligenix, Inc. (OTCQB: SNGX) ... focused on developing and commercializing products to treat ... need, announced today the long-term follow-up data from ... a first-in-class Innate Defense Regulator (IDR), in the ... neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy (CRT).  The ...
Breaking Biology Technology: