Navigation Links
Scientists find new way to manipulate DNA

Polymers, large molecules comprised of chains of repeating structures, are used in everything from the coatings on walls of ships and pipes to reduce flow drag to gene therapy.

But long polymer chains are subject to breakage, called scission, and a new study by the University of Michigan shows that as it turns out, much of what scientists previously thought about why polymers break when subjected to strong flows, such as waves crashing against a ship's bow, was wrong.

This is important for a few reasons, said Michael Solomon, associate professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering Program. Broken polymers don't function as intended, and if scientists don't know what causes them to break, they can't keep them from breaking, nor can they design them to break in specific places.

For the past 40 years, scientists have not understood exactly which forces caused scission, said Solomon, who is the co-author on a paper published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The paper, "Universal scaling for polymer chain scission in turbulence," defines which flow forces and at what levels those forces cause polymers to break in turbulence.

"This paper understands how they are breaking in a new way that resolves some issues that have been present for 40 years," Solomon said.

The experiments that yielded the prevailing scission theories, Solomon said, did not take into account turbulence in the flow that occurred during the experiments, and how that turbulence attributed to polymers breaking. Those experiments measured only laminar or smooth flow, which is turbulent free.

Yet, during their own experiments, the U-M team discovered that flow turbulence did indeed exist and that it was impacting the polymer quite a bit. Through experiments that accounted for turbulent flow, Solomon and co-authors Steven Ceccio, with appointments in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, and then-doctoral student Siva Vanapalli, were able to develop and test formulas for different polymers, and pinpoint exactly how they would react to different flows. Vanapalli is now a post-doctoral fellow at Twente University in the Netherlands.

The equation they developed can be applied to design flows that break polymers into certain lengths, or to design polymers to withstand certain flows. This could have big implications for industries that rely on polymer coatings, such as shipping or oil.

"When the polymers are working their best the friction can be reduced by 70 percent," Ceccio said.

The research also has implications in the field of gene therapy, allowing scientists another tool to control the length of the strands of DNA. In genome sequencing, the first step is to take the genome and break it into small pieces to reassemble it into the DNA strand that is best for further biochemistry, Solomon said.
'"/>

Source:University of Michigan


Related biology news :

1. Scientists ID molecular switch in liver that triggers harmful effects of saturated and trans fats
2. Scientists Replicate Hepatitis C Virus in Laboratory
3. Scientists detect probable genetic cause of some Parkinsons disease cases
4. Scientists find missing enzyme for tuberculosis iron scavenging pathway
5. Scientists seek answers on what activates deadly anthrax spores
6. Yale Scientists Find MicroRNA Regulates Ras Cancer Gene
7. Scientists collaborate to assess health of global environment
8. Scientists decipher genome of fungus that can cause life-threatening infections
9. Scientists discover the cellular roots of graying hair
10. Scientists rid stem cell culture of key animal cells
11. Scientists develop new color-coded test for protein folding

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/8/2017)... LONDON , Feb. 7, 2017 Report ... $12.5 billion by 2021 from $8.3 billion in 2016 ... from 2016 to 2021. Report Includes - An ... of global market trends, with data from 2015 and ... through 2021. - Segmentation of the market on the ...
(Date:2/6/2017)... According to Acuity Market Intelligence, ongoing ... to continue to embrace biometric and digital identification ... Border Control (ABC) eGates and 1436 Automated Passport ... 163 ports of entry across the globe. Deployments ... combined CAGR of 37%. APC Kiosks reached 75% ...
(Date:2/2/2017)... , Feb. 2, 2017  EyeLock LLC, a ... a new white paper " What You Should Know ... problem of ensuring user authenticity is a growing concern. ... authentication of users. However, traditional authentication schemes such as ... Biometric authentication offers an elegant solution to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/27/2017)... ... ... In starting a program to hire college athletes, Catalyst COO ... skill.” , In keeping with this philosophy, the Catalyst an Iowa premix manufacturer recently ... to replicate the practice throughout the company. , “I’ve heard coaches talk on television ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... FRANCISCO, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... ... of a $224K grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for the ... based on Delpor’s PROZOR technology and is expected to deliver therapeutic levels ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... N.J. , Feb. 24, 2017  Driven ... and biotechnology are now the fastest growing categories, ... Specialty Actives in Personal Care: Multi-regional Market ... research and management consulting firm Kline. ... bioprocesses that make them more effective for skin ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017  OncoSec Medical Incorporated ... immunotherapies, will host a Key Opinion Leader event to ... an oral and poster presentation at the upcoming 2017 ... The KOL event will be held in-person and via ... EST / 9:00 AM PST at the Lotte New ...
Breaking Biology Technology: