Navigation Links
Scientists discover how plants disarm the toxic effects of excessive sunlight

A newly discovered pathway by which cells protect themselves from a toxic byproduct of photosynthesis may hold important implications for bioenergy sources, human and plant disease, and agricultural yields, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison bacteriologists announced Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Plants turn energy from sunlight into bioenergy through a chemical process called photosynthesis, which also produces oxygen in its breathable form. However, photosynthesis can also generate an alternate form of singlet oxygen, which is a highly reactive and toxic substance that destroys biological molecules.

"We've discovered a pathway that cells use to turn on certain genes and respond to singlet oxygen," says Timothy Donohue, a professor of bacteriology in the university's College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and lead researcher on the paper.

"This finding should make it possible to modify plants and other photosynthetic cells to avoid the toxic effects of singlet oxygen, which could impact agriculture and the treatment of human and plant disease, and aid the effort to create alternative bioenergy sources," Donohue says.

Donohue and his group studied a photosynthetic microbe and identified the cellular pathways it used to sense the presence of singlet oxygen and defend itself from this toxic substance. He notes that the response mechanism is likely highly conserved across species from microbes to plants and humans - and therefore very applicable to other fields of study.

For example, too much sunlight can actually be harmful to plants, because the heightened photosynthetic activity also means an increase in singlet oxygen. By modifying plants to enhance the protective pathway, "we could be able to get larger crop yield per photon of light," he says.

And by making cells more resistant to singlet oxygen, scientists may be better able to design bioenergy systems that use sunlight as
'"/>

Source:University of Wisconsin-Madison


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Scientists ID molecular switch in liver that triggers harmful effects of saturated and trans fats
2. Scientists Replicate Hepatitis C Virus in Laboratory
3. Scientists detect probable genetic cause of some Parkinsons disease cases
4. Scientists find missing enzyme for tuberculosis iron scavenging pathway
5. Scientists seek answers on what activates deadly anthrax spores
6. Yale Scientists Find MicroRNA Regulates Ras Cancer Gene
7. Scientists collaborate to assess health of global environment
8. Scientists decipher genome of fungus that can cause life-threatening infections
9. Scientists discover the cellular roots of graying hair
10. Scientists rid stem cell culture of key animal cells
11. Scientists develop new color-coded test for protein folding
Post Your Comments:
(Date:8/21/2014)... of researchers at Louisiana Tech University has ... consumer-grade 3D printers and materials to fabricate ... and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery. ... and research faculty from Louisiana Tech,s biomedical ... create filament extruders that can make medical-quality ...
(Date:8/21/2014)... Carolina State University have developed a novel and versatile ... applications for creating new materials as well as for ... technique allows us to model much larger and more ... quickly," says Nan Li, lead author of a paper ... State,s Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "This is ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... HOUSTON, Aug. 20, 2014 George E. Fox, a John ... University of Houston (UH), was named a fellow in the ... (ISSOL). , Fox is one of four members ... Spain chosen as fellows in 2014. Fellows are elected ... With more than 500 members from more than 20 countries, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Louisiana Tech University researchers use 3D printers to create custom medical implants 2Louisiana Tech University researchers use 3D printers to create custom medical implants 3Researchers develop models to study polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA 2UH professor named fellow by International Astrobiology Society 2
... Ore. -- (Feb. 24, 2011) -- Neither births nor deaths ... theoretical physicist John J. Toner of the University of Oregon. ... could point to new cancer therapies. Picture any scenario ... cells, cancer cells, fish, and even tiny plastic rods on ...
... contamination caused by road traffic not only affects the air, ... soil and plants. Jos Antonio Carrero, a chemist at the ... subject and studied the extent of the impact of the ... in the short, medium and long term and for this ...
... have many useful applications, but also raise some potential ... plastic nanoparticles are transported through the aquatic food chain ... is published Feb. 22 in the open access journal ... slowed their feeding behavior, and also affected metabolic parameters ...
Cached Biology News:New theory shows that neither birth nor death stops a flock 2New theory shows that neither birth nor death stops a flock 3Car tracks beyond the asphalt 2Car tracks beyond the asphalt 3
(Date:8/22/2014)... Canada (PRWEB) August 22, 2014 ... in model organisms can be accelerated by exome ... and manufacturing technologies, the custom SeqCap EZ Developer ... research. , Mr. Watson will additionally present how ... with commercially available human and mouse exome kits. ...
(Date:8/21/2014)... Aug. 21, 2014  BioSpecifics Technologies Corp. (NASDAQ: ... first in class collagenase-based products marketed as XIAFLEX ... the U.S. and XIAPEX ® in the ... a randomized, double-blind Phase 2a study of CCH ... fibrosclerotic panniculopathy. The results showed that all three ...
(Date:8/21/2014)... for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, ... "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing ... in PLOS One scientific journal today, ... vision algorithms similar to those used in facial ... diagnostically most relevant areas. Tablet computers can be ...
(Date:8/21/2014)... 21, 2014 2014 Deep ... is a professional and in-depth research report ... provides basic Seaweed Fertilizer information, including Seaweed ... structure as well as industry overview. This ... domestic market as well as global industry ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Efficient Identification of Protein-Coding Variants in a Model Organism Through Exome Sequencing, New Webinar Hosted by Xtalks 2BioSpecifics Technologies Corp. Announces Positive Data from Phase 2a Study of CCH for Treatment of Cellulite 2BioSpecifics Technologies Corp. Announces Positive Data from Phase 2a Study of CCH for Treatment of Cellulite 3BioSpecifics Technologies Corp. Announces Positive Data from Phase 2a Study of CCH for Treatment of Cellulite 4BioSpecifics Technologies Corp. Announces Positive Data from Phase 2a Study of CCH for Treatment of Cellulite 5A novel 'man and machine' decision support system makes malaria diagnostics more effective 2Internationals Seaweed Fertilizer Industry 2014 Development Trend Analysis in New Research Study at DeepResearchReports.com 2Internationals Seaweed Fertilizer Industry 2014 Development Trend Analysis in New Research Study at DeepResearchReports.com 3
... Research Sample Services , ... individual research samples, , including PCR products ... sequencing service is powered by Agencourts barcode driven sample tracking , ... our online , submission form and send ...
... , href="http://www.ambion.com/catalog/CatNum.php?1632"> Silencer , ... they can , be readily adapted for ... can be used for this application. See "<A , ... Cells " for experimintal data using dsRNA , ...
... , , NAVIGATE THIS ARTICLE: <A , ... an NPA? > <A , href="#2">Advantages , ... > <A , ... What is a Nuclease Protection , ...
Cached Biology Technology:QuickLane 24 - 48 Hour Sequencing 2Fluorescently Labeling Long dsRNA with the Silencer siRNA Labeling Kit 2Fluorescently Labeling Long dsRNA with the Silencer siRNA Labeling Kit 3Fluorescently Labeling Long dsRNA with the Silencer siRNA Labeling Kit 4Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 2Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 3Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 4Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 5Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 6Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 7Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 8Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 9Nuclease Protection Assays: The Basics 10
...
Newborn Calf Serum US Origin...
SPDP-Trinitrophenol (TNP) Bovine Serum Albumin...
Acrylamide, 500 g. Assay: > 99.9%, acrylic acid: < 0.001%. Conductivity (35%): < 2 umhos/cm.Risks: 45, 46, 48, 23, 24, 25 ; Safety Precautions: 53, 44. Category: Nucleotides & Enzymes & Biochemicals...
Biology Products: