Navigation Links
Scalpel-free surgery could reduce risk of HIV and hepatitis exposure for health care workers

While the incidence of disease from HIV and hepatitis is increasing in the United States, little is known about their prevalence in patients undergoing surgery. Now, researchers have shown that nearly 40 percent of surgeries at The Johns Hopkins Hospital occur in patients who tested positive for a bloodborne germ.

"While these rates are alarming, they are not entirely unexpected. General precautions have been in effect for some time to prevent the spread of disease to health care workers in the operating room," said Martin A. Makary, M.D., assistant professor of surgery and public health at Johns Hopkins and lead author of a report in the May 2005 issue of the Annals of Surgery.

"Given the high incidence of these infections, however, we have developed new strategies such as 'sharpless' surgery-a surgical technique which uses high-technology alternatives to needles and knives. We advocate using these techniques whenever possible in high-risk settings to further protect health care workers from accidental transmission," added Makary.

Sharpless surgical techniques include laparoscopy, electrocautery to replace scalpel incisions, and skin clips or glue instead of sewing to close or repair wounds.

Previous studies have shown that health care workers are injured in about 7 percent of operations. As many as 87 percent of surgeons will receive an injury that breaks the skin -- thus allowing for possible disease transmission - at some point in their career. There are an estimated 40,000 new cases of HIV each year, and hepatitis C is increasing at an even faster rate, according to the report. The study concludes that by studying the rates of HIV and hepatitis B and C among patients presenting for surgery, a more accurate incidence of disease is measured within a community, bypassing the selection bias of traditional statistics of known infected patients presenting to primary care clinics. Furthermore, the authors report that blood-borne pathogen
'"/>

Source:Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Rare surgery performed to remove pancreas, prevent diabetes
2. 3D ultrasound device poised to advance minimally invasive surgery
3. For one Stanford doctor, the beat goes on during open-heart surgery
4. Unique equine cataract surgery offered on routine basis
5. Cheaper and simpler keyhole surgery
6. Robot assisted surgery more accurate than conventional surgery
7. U of MN uses robotic surgery techniques in cardiac cell therapy research
8. New biologic treatment for tennis elbow may replace surgery for chronic sufferers
9. Jefferson scientists find high glucose before surgery raises risk of dangerous complications
10. Successful lung cancer surgery not enough to break nicotine dependence in many smokers
11. Computer scientists unravel language of surgery
Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/23/2014)... decades of in-depth monitoring, has provided unique insights ... population of top-predators. Published in Nature ... have significantly altered in accordance with changes in ... Despite a shift in the population towards ,fitter, ... generations, leaving the population in decline. , ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... super strength, but it also holds the promise of ... ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative ... international group using spinach to study the proteins involved ... sun,s energy into carbohydrates used to power cellular processes. ... most efficient system ever built, capable of converting the ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... July 23, 2014 Migratory songbirds are disappearing, and ... climate change, loss of habitat, acid rain and light ... missing: where do these birds go once they leave ... encountering along the way? , To answer this question, ... created the first ever migratory connectivity map produced for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals 2Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals 3Spinach could lead to alternative energy more powerful than Popeye 2York University researchers use bird 'backpacks' to put wood thrushes migration on the map 2
... BIO-key International, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: BKYI), a leader in ... Institute will deploy BIO-key,s TruDonor biometric identification technology to enhance the convenience ... , , ... , , ...
... to the casual observer to be busily buzzing and blooming ... regionsa fact that scientists have thoroughly documentedthe distribution of species ... surprising and subtle ways. So explains Janne Soininen of the ... 2010 issue of BioScience . Soininen ...
... NY When the first warm rays of springtime sunshine ... if someone flicked a switch to turn on the greenery ... into this process, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy,s ... Wisconsin, Madison, have deciphered the structure of a molecular "switch" ...
Cached Biology News:Oklahoma Blood Institute to Leverage BIO-key(R) Breakthrough TruDonor(TM) Fingerprint Donor Identification 2Oklahoma Blood Institute to Leverage BIO-key(R) Breakthrough TruDonor(TM) Fingerprint Donor Identification 3Oklahoma Blood Institute to Leverage BIO-key(R) Breakthrough TruDonor(TM) Fingerprint Donor Identification 4Scientists decipher structure of nature's 'light switch' 2Scientists decipher structure of nature's 'light switch' 3
(Date:7/23/2014)... (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 Last year, ... Systems , a leading global provider of data management ... with TrialMaster, a leading-edge system for electronic data capture ... of universal design and study execution tools added TrialMaster ... and much anticipated version of Transform for TrialMaster, is ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... , July 23, 2014 ... company of Trendlines Agtech , announced it ... Israel,s leading agricultural thermoplastics applications ... Valentis,s technology combines nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a ... with additional nanoparticles to produce highly improved polymeric ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Massachusetts , July 23, 2014 ... SHPG ), the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, ... today announced a worldwide licensing and collaboration agreement ... for the potential treatment of both the central ... with Hunter syndrome (MPS II). This collaboration strengthens ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... California (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 With the ... in HD resolution for more than 15 minutes, Fastec Imaging ... the world of high speed imaging. “Finally, a high speed ... camera we use in our everyday lives.” proclaims Matt Kearney, ... Fastec has always been to demystify and simplify the traditionally ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Formedix and OmniComm Systems® Partnership Strengthened with the Release of Enhanced TrialMaster® Integration for EDC Build 2Formedix and OmniComm Systems® Partnership Strengthened with the Release of Enhanced TrialMaster® Integration for EDC Build 3Valentis Nanotech Signs MOU to Integrate Technology in Thermoplastics Production 2Shire Enters Strategic Licensing and Collaboration Agreement With ArmaGen 2Shire Enters Strategic Licensing and Collaboration Agreement With ArmaGen 3Shire Enters Strategic Licensing and Collaboration Agreement With ArmaGen 4Shire Enters Strategic Licensing and Collaboration Agreement With ArmaGen 5Fastec Imaging Introduces the First High Speed Camcorder 2Fastec Imaging Introduces the First High Speed Camcorder 3
... Submission demonstrates progress of plant-derived insulin program, ... -, TSX symbol: SBS, CALGARY, July ... company developing a portfolio of therapeutic,proteins for metabolic ... an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for,safflower-produced recombinant ...
... ArunA Biomedical, Inc., the first,company to commercialize human ... that William T. Sharp has been named President,and ... leadership,responsibilities, Mr. Sharp has also been appointed to ... Steven Stice, PhD, who will,remain ArunA,s Chairman and ...
... MADISON Though bacteria are everywhere from the air we ... the vast majority are innocuous or even beneficial, and only ... microbial guest from an unwanted intruder? , Research from the ... but with the host. , A study appearing online this week ...
Cached Biology Technology:SemBioSys submits IND for safflower-produced insulin to U.S. FDA 2SemBioSys submits IND for safflower-produced insulin to U.S. FDA 3ArunA Biomedical Names William T. Sharp President and Chief Executive Officer 2Symbiotic microbes induce profound genetic changes in their hosts 2
Activating Agents, 7-azabenzotriazol-1-yloxy-tris-(pyrrolidino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate...
Each 72-well MiniTray is low profile, with lid. Conical well shape, 10 l....
The E. coli Expression System with Gateway Technology is designed to create E. coli expression clones containing the T7 promoter. The expression clones are ready for transformation and expression in ...
...
Biology Products: