Navigation Links
Roundup®highly lethal to amphibians, finds University of Pittsburgh researcher

The herbicide Roundup® is widely used to eradicate weeds. But a study published today by a University of Pittsburgh researcher finds that the chemical may be eradicating much more than that.

Pitt assistant professor of biology Rick Relyea found that Roundup®, the second most commonly applied herbicide in the United States, is "extremely lethal" to amphibians. This field experiment is one of the most extensive studies on the effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms in a natural setting, and the results may provide a key link to global amphibian declines.

In a paper titled "The Impact of Insecticides and Herbicides on the Biodiversity and Productivity of Aquatic Communities," published in the journal Ecological Applications, Relyea examined how a pond's entire community--25 species, including crustaceans, insects, snails, and tadpoles--responded to the addition of the manufacturers' recommended doses of two insecticides--Sevin® (carbaryl) and malathion--and two herbicides--Roundup® (glyphosate) and 2,4-D.

Relyea found that Roundup® caused a 70 percent decline in amphibian biodiversity and an 86 percent decline in the total mass of tadpoles. Leopard frog tadpoles and gray tree frog tadpoles were completely eliminated and wood frog tadpoles and toad tadpoles were nearly eliminated. One species of frog, spring peepers, was unaffected.

"The most shocking insight coming out of this was that Roundup®, something designed to kill plants, was extremely lethal to amphibians," said Relyea, who conducted the research at Pitt's Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. "We added Roundup®, and the next day we looked in the tanks and there were dead tadpoles all over the bottom."

Relyea initially conducted the experiment to see whether the Roundup® would have an indirect effect on the frogs by killing their food source, the algae. However, he found that Roundup®, although an herbicide, actually increased the amount of algae in the pond because it k illed most of the frogs.

"It's like killing all the cows in a field and seeing that the field has more grass in it--not because you made the grass grow better, but because you killed everything that eats grass," he said.

Previous research had found that the lethal ingredient in Roundup® was not the herbicide itself, glyphosate, but rather the surfactant, or detergent, that allows the herbicide to penetrate the waxy surfaces of plants. In Roundup®, that surfactant is a chemical called polyethoxylated tallowamine. Other herbicides have less dangerous surfactants: For example, Relyea's study found that 2,4-D had no effect on tadpoles.

"We've repeated the experiment, so we're confident that this is, in fact, a repeatable result that we see," said Relyea. "It's fair to say that nobody would have guessed Roundup® was going to be so lethal to amphibians."


'"/>

Source:University of Pittsburgh Medical Center


Related biology news :

1. Gene-specific Ebola therapies protect non-human primates from lethal disease
2. Genetic network guards against lethal DNA damage
3. Researchers discover key mechanism by which lethal viruses Ebola and Marburg cause disease
4. Study uncovers a lethal secret of 1918 influenza virus
5. Anthrax paralyzes immune cells with lethal toxin, UF research shows
6. Peramivir protects mice from lethal H5N1 infection
7. Current human embryonic stem cell lines contaminated UCSD/Salk team finds
8. Study finds more than one-third of human genome regulated by RNA
9. ASU researchers finds novel chemistry at work to provide parrots vibrant red colors
10. Same mutation aided evolution in many fish species, Stanford study finds
11. NC State scientist finds soft tissue in T. rex bones
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/18/2017)... Calif. , April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global ... of a media edge server, the M820, which features the company,s ... recognition software provided by Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during ... at the NAB show at the Las Vegas ... ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 According to a new market ... Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, ... Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to ... of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/25/2017)... ... July 25, 2017 , ... ... welcome Chuck Heinz as Executive Director of Strategic Planning. His extensive background ... team. , Chuck’s professional experience encompasses marketing and differentiation consulting, business strategy ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... , July 24, 2017 Intralytix, Inc. ... funding from Lesaffre, a French family group. This investment ... companies to develop and commercialize bacteriophage-based products, for various ... mutual interest. ... Lesaffre designs manufactures and markets innovative solutions for baking, ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation ... Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as its ... an individual who has made and is continuing to make significant transformative breakthroughs ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... , ... July 20, 2017 , ... ... health-related quality of life, today announced its full advisory board. The board comprises ... the promotion of James Crooks, PhD, former VP of Engineering, to Chief Technology ...
Breaking Biology Technology: