Navigation Links
Researchers find 'secret weapon' used by SARS virus

In 2003, the highly contagious and often-deadly mystery disease now called SARS emerged explosively out of Southern China. It eventually killed an estimated 916 people in Asia, Europe, and North and South America--nearly one in ten of those it infected.

When scientists identified the virus that caused this sudden acute respiratory syndrome, they classified it as a coronavirus--a virus family whose other members cause many common colds. But to there was nothing common about the lethality of SARS; clearly, this coronavirus had some nasty tricks up its sleeve.

Now, in a discovery that suggests a possible new route by which scientists might fashion a vaccine against SARS, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) have uncovered one of those tricks: a "secret weapon" that the SARS coronavirus uses to sabotage the immune defenses of infected cells. Experiments conducted by the UTMB scientists show that a SARS coronavirus protein called "nsp1" causes the breakdown of biochemical messages that normally prompt the production of a protein critical to defending the body against viruses.

"The SARS nsp1 protein degrades the messenger RNA instructions sent from DNA to make interferon beta, which is crucial to host immunity," said UTMB professor of microbiology and immunology Shinji Makino, senior author of a paper on the discovery to be published online the week of August 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This is a very rare phenomenon, and it raises a lot of questions -- among them, whether we can make a mutant form of SARS coronavirus that lacks the ability to degrade messenger RNA, which could ultimately lead to the creation of a live attenuated vaccine for SARS."

Although many viruses interfere with host cells making messenger RNA or translating it into infection-fighting proteins, only one other virus is known to break down messenger RNA: herpes simplex virus (HSV).

Mak ino credits lead author Wataru Kamitani, a UTMB postdoctoral research fellow, with noticing that the nsp1 protein had an unexpected effect while he was investigating a different set of SARS coronavirus proteins. "He found this suppression of host gene expression, and then he designed several elegant experiments that showed it was caused by RNA degradation, something never before seen in an RNA virus."

Exactly how that degradation takes place, how an RNA virus can preserve its integrity when it makes a protein that breaks down RNA, and whether a mutated non-RNA-degrading SARS coronavirus could constitute a workable SARS vaccine are all issues that Makino's group intends to pursue. "The main concern for everybody is whether SARS will come back," Makino said. "We want to be ready for it if it does."


'"/>

Source:University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston


Related biology news :

1. Researchers discover way to make cells in the eye sensitive to light
2. Researchers find how protein allows insects to detect and respond to pheromones
3. Researchers Uncover Key Step In Manufacture of Memory Protein
4. Researchers reveal the infectious impact of salmon farms on wild salmon
5. Researchers identify target for cancer drugs
6. Researchers discover molecule that causes secondary stroke
7. Researchers find missing genes of ancient organism
8. Researchers trace evolution to relatively simple genetic changes
9. Researchers add new tool to tumor-treatment arsenal
10. UF Researchers Map Bacterial Proteins That Cause Tooth Loss
11. VCU Researchers Identify Networks Of Genes Responding To Alcohol In The Brain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/4/2017)... NEW YORK , April 4, 2017   ... solutions, today announced that the United States Patent and ... The patent broadly covers the linking of an iris ... the same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... our latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... LOS ANGELES , March 30, 2017  On ... Hack the Genome hackathon at ... This exciting two-day competition will focus on developing health ... experience. Hack the Genome is ... has been tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities and forecast in ... by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, hand ... by end use industry (government and law enforcement, commercial ... banking, and others), and by region ( North ... Asia Pacific , and the Rest of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 20, ... ... (IPS), a leading global provider of engineering, architecture, project controls, construction management, ... prefabricated cleanrooms, today announced the unveiling of the iCON™ brand which represents ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... , ... September 20, 2017 ... ... published findings of a study examining the effects of exoskeleton-assisted walking on ... cord injury (SCI). The article, "Neuromechanical adaptations during a robotic powered exoskeleton ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... molecular manufacturing and other transformative technologies, announced the winners for the 2017 Foresight ... other for Theory in nanotechnology/molecular manufacturing. , Established in 1993 and named in ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... The latest generation of the AutoBlock, ... prep for metals digestion—the addition of acids and reagents. The accessory fits any ... is ideal for any laboratory performing their own unique metals digestion method. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: