Navigation Links
Research may provide new link between soft drinks and weight gain

A University of Cincinnati (UC) study provides new evidence that drinking large amounts of beverages containing fructose adds body fat, and might explain why sweetening with fructose could be even worse than using other sweeteners.

Researchers allowed mice to freely consume either water, fructose sweetened water or soft drinks. They found increased body fat in the mice that drank the fructose-sweetened water and soft drinks--despite that fact that these animals decreased the amount of calories they consumed from solid food.

This, said author Matthias Tschöp, MD, associate professor in UC's psychiatry department and a member of the Obesity Research Center at UC's Genome Research Institute, suggests that the total amount of calories consumed when fructose is added to diets may not be the only explanation for weight gain. Instead, he said, consuming fructose appears to affect metabolic rate in a way that favors fat storage.

"Our study shows how fat mass increases as a direct consequence of soft drink consumption," said Dr. Tschöp.

The research appears in the July 2005 issue of Obesity Research, the official journal of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity (NAASO).

Consumption of sweetened foods and beverages containing sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup?particularly carbonated soft drinks and some juices and cereals--has been thought to be a leading cause of obesity. A widely used sweetener derived from corn, high-fructose corn syrup is similar to sucrose (table sugar) in its composition, about half glucose and half fructose.

Dr. Tschöp's lab used novel body composition analyzers that use magnetic resonance technology to carefully monitor body fat in mice.

All the mice began the study at an average weight of 39 grams. Those consuming the fructose-sweetened water showed significant weight gain over the course of the study, with an average final weight of 48 grams--compared with averages below 44 grams for the other groups--and had about 90 percent more body fat than the mice that consumed water only.

Total caloric intake was lower in the mice that consumed the fructose-sweetened water than in the other groups, except for the control animals provided with water only.

"We were surprised to see that mice actually ate less when exposed to fructose-sweetened beverages, and therefore didn't consume more overall calories," said Dr. Tschöp. "Nevertheless, they gained significantly more body fat within a few weeks."

Results from an earlier study in humans led by Peter Havel, DVM, PhD, an endocrinology researcher at the University of California, Davis, and coauthored by Dr. Tschöp, found that several hormones involved in the regulation of body weight, including leptin, insulin and ghrelin, do not respond to fructose as they do to other types of carbohydrates, such as glucose.

Based on that study and their new data, the researchers now also believe that another factor contributing to the increased fat storage is that the liver metabolizes fructose differently than it does other carbohydrates.

"Similar to dietary fat, fructose doesn't appear to fully trigger the hormonal systems involved in the long-term control of food intake and energy metabolism," said coauthor Dr. Havel.

The researchers say that further studies in humans are needed to determine if high-fructose corn syrup in soft drinks is directly responsible for the current increase in human obesity.


'"/>

Source:University of Cincinnati


Related biology news :

1. Researchers discover way to make cells in the eye sensitive to light
2. Quantum Dots Research Leads to New Knowledge about Protein Binding in Plants
3. Researchers find how protein allows insects to detect and respond to pheromones
4. Researchers Uncover Key Step In Manufacture of Memory Protein
5. Research advances quest for HIV-1 vaccine
6. Research on Worms Yields Clues on Aging
7. Researchers reveal the infectious impact of salmon farms on wild salmon
8. Researchers identify target for cancer drugs
9. Weill Cornell Research Reveals Secrets Of Trafficking Within Cells
10. Researchers discover molecule that causes secondary stroke
11. Researchers find missing genes of ancient organism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/5/2016)... , Dec. 5, 2016  The Office ... today published "Can CT Scans Enhance or Replace ... the potential of supporting or replacing forensic autopsies ... CT scan. In response to recommendations ... is exploring using CT scans as a potential ...
(Date:11/29/2016)... BOSTON , Nov. 29, 2016 BioDirection, ... rapid point-of-care products for the objective detection of concussion ... the company has successfully completed a meeting with the ... company,s Tbit™ blood test Pre-Submission Package. During the meeting ... Tbit™ system as a precursor to commencement of a ...
(Date:11/22/2016)... According to the new market research report "Biometric ... Signature, Voice), Multi-Factor), Component (Hardware and Software), Function (Contact and Non-contact), Application, ... is expected to grow from USD 10.74 Billion in 2015 to reach ... and 2022. Continue Reading ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... Eutilex Co. Ltd. today announced that it ... A financing. This financing round included participation from DS ... Bio Angel. This new funding brings the total capital ... since its founding in 2015. The ... commercialization of its immuno-oncology programs, expand its R&D capabilities ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... 8, 2016   Biocept, Inc . (NASDAQ: ... of clinically actionable liquid biopsy tests to improve ... data featuring its Target Selector™ Circulating Tumor Cell ... the detection of actionable biomarkers in patients with ... by Sara Cannon Research Institute (SCRI), the research ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... 2016 , ... A new study published in the just-published ... advanced pancreatic cancer, liquid biopsies are not yet an adequate substitute for tissue ... sampling may improve the value of a blood-based test.” The study was conducted ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , Dec. 7, 2016 Neogen Corporation (NASDAQ: ... Dr. Dan Kephart as its chief science ... will assume his responsibilities at Neogen effective Jan. 1. ... director for the agribusiness unit of Thermo Fisher Scientific, ... at Life Technologies. His extensive industry experience also includes ...
Breaking Biology Technology: