Navigation Links
Research could lead to better drugs and whiter whites

Groundbreaking research published today could revolutionise the way drugs are made and have major implications for the industrial sector, say its authors.

The University of Manchester team, working with colleagues in Bristol, has provided a unique insight into the working of enzymes ?biological molecules that speed up chemical reactions in the body.

When these chemical reactions go wrong they can lead to disease, so modern drugs are designed to target enzymes and 'switch them off'.

But their ability to accelerate chemical reactions means enzymes are also used in a number of commercial processes, including brewing, food processing, domestic cleaning and paper manufacturing.

"Improving our fundamental knowledge of how enzymes work is important to a wide range of pharmaceutical and industrial fields," said Professor Nigel Scrutton, one of the lead researchers at Manchester.

"Enzymes are central to the existence of life because most chemical reactions in our cells would take place too slowly or produce a different outcome without their involvement.

"But when enzymes malfunction they can cause serious diseases, so modern drugs are designed to prevent enzymes accelerating, or 'catalysing', inappropriate reactions.

"Our research has shown at an atomic level how enzymes act as catalysts; the findings are a radical departure from the traditional view of how they work and might explain why attempts to make artificial enzymes have so far been disappointing.

The work ?published as a major research article in the leading journal Science ?builds on earlier studies by Professor Scrutton and Manchester colleagues, Professor Michael Sutcliffe and Dr David Leys.

Together they have shown, now in unprecedented detail, how enzymes avoid unfavourable energy barriers caused by the resistance to a reaction by allowing matter to 'flow through' the barrier ?a process known as quantum mechanical tunnelling.

"We hav e provided new insight into how enzymes work from painstaking efforts of a large interdisciplinary group based on detailed experimental observations and theoretical analysis at the atomic level," said Professor Scrutton, who is based in the University's Faculty of Life Sciences.

"Modern drugs are designed to have structures that stick to enzymes and prevent them from catalysing the reactions, so our results need to be taken into account when designing new drugs.

"In the longer term, this research could also help us exploit enzymes more successfully and lead to better manufacturing processes in a number of commercial sectors.

"In cleaning products, for instance, enzymes help speed up the chemical reactions that break down protein and starch stains; a better understanding of how this process works could one day lead to more effective, faster acting agents."


'"/>

Source:University of Manchester


Related biology news :

1. Researchers discover way to make cells in the eye sensitive to light
2. Quantum Dots Research Leads to New Knowledge about Protein Binding in Plants
3. Researchers find how protein allows insects to detect and respond to pheromones
4. Researchers Uncover Key Step In Manufacture of Memory Protein
5. Research advances quest for HIV-1 vaccine
6. Research on Worms Yields Clues on Aging
7. Researchers reveal the infectious impact of salmon farms on wild salmon
8. Researchers identify target for cancer drugs
9. Weill Cornell Research Reveals Secrets Of Trafficking Within Cells
10. Researchers discover molecule that causes secondary stroke
11. Researchers find missing genes of ancient organism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/2/2017)... LONDON , March 2, 2017 Who ... infringement lawsuits? Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4313699/ ... ON THE FINGERPRINT SENSOR FIELD? Fingerprint sensors using ... smartphones. The fingerprint sensor vendor Idex forecasts an increase ... in mobile devices and of the fingerprint sensor market ...
(Date:3/1/2017)... BEDFORD, Mass. , March 1, 2017  Aware, ... and services, announced that Richard P. Moberg ... Officer and co-President and Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer ... will continue to serve as a member of the ... T. Russell , Aware,s co-Chief Executive Officer and co-President, ...
(Date:2/28/2017)... News solutions for biometrics, bag drop and New ADA-compliant ... At PTE ... March, Materna will present its complete end-to-end passenger journey, ... real benefit for passengers. To accelerate the whole passenger handling ... solutions to take passengers through the complete integrated process with ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... ROCKVILLE, Md. , March 24, 2017  Infectex ... Fund (MBVF), today announced positive results of a Phase ... drug therapy regimen in patients with multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis ... by scientists at Sequella, Inc. ( USA ... A total of 140 patients were enrolled ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- Agenus Inc. (NASDAQ: AGEN), an immuno-oncology company with ... today announced participation at the following conferences: ... Maidstone Life Sciences conference "Cancer Immunotherapy Conference" at the ... York, NY . Agenus will participate in three ... Robert B. Stein , M.D., Ph.D., President, R&D ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017  SeraCare Life Sciences, ... in vitro diagnostics manufacturers and clinical laboratories, ... first multiplexed Inherited Cancer reference material ... by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The Seraseqâ„¢ Inherited Cancer ... input from industry experts to validate the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 NetworkNewsWire Editorial Coverage  ... Cancer remains one ... on health care systems, in terms of costs and resources. ... does the development of innovative and efficient therapies that demonstrate ... many types of cancer treatments, a growing number of patients ...
Breaking Biology Technology: