Navigation Links
Progress toward an antitumor vaccine

How can we induce the body to use its own weapon, the immune system, to battle cancer" In principle, by the same means used against infectious diseases: immunization. The production of a selective vaccine is not a trivial task, however. A team led by Horst Kunst at the University of Mainz has now found a way to bind a molecule that is typical for tumors to a carrier protein without irritating the immune system. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their method is based on an immunocompatible connection by way of a sulfur atom, namely, a thioether.

Epithelial tumor cells have unusually large amounts of mucin MUC1 on their surface. This MUC1, in comparison with its “normal” cousins, is also modified in a very characteristic manner. Mucins are mucilaginous substances that protect the surfaces of mucus membranes. They are glycoproteins—macromolecules with a central protein chain and long side chains made of polysaccharides. The modified MUC1 would be a good target molecule (antigen) for antibodies in immunological antitumor therapy.

The difficulty with this approach is that such sugar-containing compounds are completely ineffective at stimulating the immune system to form antibodies. “Immunization is only successful if the vaccine is anchored to an immunizing carrier protein by means of a spacer,” explains Kunz. This would be very easy to accomplish with polysaccharides, but turns out to be very complicated with glycoproteins, because the protein portion of the molecule has many reactive groups that are attacked in the coupling reaction. “In addition,” says Kunz, “many of the structures that make suitable anchors are themselves highly immunogenic, which can suppress the immune response against the true target, the glycoprotein.”

This team has now found a good anchoring technique: Their anchor is a thioether (two carbon atoms coupled together through a sulfur atom). To this end, the carrier protein is first equipped with a spac er, which has an allyl group (two carbon atoms attached by a double bond) at its end. The glycopeptide is coupled to a building block that causes thiols (sulfur–hydrogen groups) to protrude from the molecule. In the next, light-initiated (photochemical) reaction, only the desired thioether bonds are formed—no side reactions occur at other locations in the peptide chain.

“Synthetic glycopeptide antigens containing structural elements typical of tumors in the sugar as well as the protein segment,” explains Kunz, “can thus be attached to the carrier protein in a controlled fashion. The largely nonimmunogenic thioether bridges could clear the way for the development of vaccines for immunization against tumor cells.”


'"/>

Source:John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Related biology news :

1. Bevacizumab Combined With Chemotherapy Improves Progression-Free Survival for Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer
2. AIDS Public Awareness Campaign Expands Following Report Of Rapidly Progressive HIV
3. Progress on HIV/AIDS significant but insufficient
4. Progress being made in exploring potential use of stem cells to treat heart disease
5. Progress made in HIV vaccine development
6. Progress toward artificial photosynthesis?
7. Unchecked DNA replication drives earliest steps toward cancer
8. Virologists make major step towards understanding the process of HIV infection
9. Moffitt-USF head toward first human trials of anti-cancer drug that targets protein AKT
10. Cats indifference towards sugar explained
11. A step toward the $1,000 personal genome using readily available lab equipment

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017 ... its vendor landscape is marked by the presence of ... is however held by five major players - 3M ... these companies accounted for nearly 61% of the global ... leading companies in the global military biometrics market boast ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... According to a new market research report "Consumer ... Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, and Region - ... to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to USD 31.75 Billion ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards and Mr. ... the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief Executive Officer said," ... and benefiting from their considerable expertise as we move forward ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... At its national board meeting ... I. Sheikh, the co-founder, CEO and chief research scientist of Minnesota-based Advanced Space ... membership in ARCS Alumni Hall of Fame . ASTER Labs is a ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... BioMarketing, a leading provider of patient support solutions, has announced ... network, which will launch this week. The VMS CNEs will ... to enhance the patient care experience by delivering peer-to-peer education ... professionals to help women who have been diagnosed and are ... ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San Diego-based ... of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is part ... as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also expand ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017 SomaGenics announced ... the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to ... profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single cells using ... highlights the need to accelerate development of approaches to ... "New techniques for measuring levels of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: