Navigation Links
Parental genes do what's best for baby

A molecular ‘battle of the sexes?long considered the major driving force in a baby’s development is being challenged by a new genetic theory of parental teamwork.

Biologists at The University of Manchester say the prevailing view that maternal and paternal genes compete for supremacy in their unborn offspring fails to answer some important questions relating to child development.

In fact, rather than a parental power struggle, the researchers suggest that certain offspring characteristics can only be explained by their theory of genetic cooperation.

“When we are conceived we inherit two copies of every gene ?one set from our mother and one from our father,?explained Dr Jason Wolf, who led the research in Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences.

“But some genes ?through a process called genomic imprinting ?only use one parent’s copy; the spare copy from the other parent is silenced by a chemical stamp.?

The concept of imprinting has long puzzled scientists as it appears to undermine the natural benefits organisms gain from inheriting two sets of genes.

If one copy of a gene is damaged, for instance, then the second copy can compensate; imprinted genes lose this safeguard and so are more susceptible to disease. Errors in imprinting have also been linked to cancer and other genetic disorders.

Scientists have argued that the reason some genes only use or ‘express?one copy is due to a conflict between paternal and maternal interests.

In the natural world, for example, males would hope to produce large offspring to give them the best chance of survival and carry on their gene line. But large offspring require greater maternal investment, so females will try to impose their genetic stamp so that smaller young are born.

“The idea that imprinting evolves because of conflict between males and females over maternal investment in their offspring has become a generally accepted truth that has rem ained largely unchallenged,?said Dr Wolf.

“But we have shown that selection for positive interactions between mothers and their offspring, rather than conflict, can produce the sorts of imprinting patterns we see for a lot of genes.

“For example, during placental development the maternal and offspring genomes have to work together to produce a functional placenta. By expressing the genes they get from their mothers, the offspring are more likely to show an adaptive fit with their mother’s genes; they complement each other and so work better together to produce the placenta.?
'"/>

Source:University of Manchester


Related biology news :

1. Newly-discovered class of genes determines ?and restricts ?stem cell fate
2. Inexpensive, mass-produced genes core of synthetic biology advances at UH
3. First atlas of key brain genes could speed research on cancer, neurological diseases
4. U-M scientists find genes that control growth of common skin cancer
5. Researchers find missing genes of ancient organism
6. Scientists document complex genomic events leading to the birth of new genes
7. Genrate: a generative model that finds and scores new genes and exons in genomic microarray data
8. Advances in the characterisation of the oyster mushroom genes
9. Researchers find new genes necessary to make embryo
10. Protein helps regulate the genes of embryonic stem cells
11. Compounds in plastic packaging act as environmental estrogens altering breast genes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2017)... York , April 19, 2017 ... as its vendor landscape is marked by the presence ... market is however held by five major players - ... Together these companies accounted for nearly 61% of the ... the leading companies in the global military biometrics market ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... MONICA, Calif. , April 13, 2017 ... New York will feature emerging and evolving ... Summits. Both Innovation Summits will run alongside the expo ... of speaker sessions, panels and demonstrations focused on trending ... coast,s largest advanced design and manufacturing event will take ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period 2017-2021. ... prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry ... over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/16/2017)... ... June 16, 2017 , ... Cognition ... just announced two more sessions of its “From the Helm” Webinar Series. ... world of online templates for design control exercises. Led by David Cronin, Cognition’s ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... 2017 , ... New resistant soybean and cotton cropping systems ... amaranth and other broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate. But scientists with the Weed ... known to drift and to cause harm to sensitive, off-target broadleaf plants. , ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... Houston, TX (PRWEB) , ... June 15, 2017 ... ... investment in Saranas, a promising new medical device startup. Dan Parsley, angelMD’s SVP ... Saranas by angelMD members, and this angelMD syndicate is part of Saranas’ recently ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... ... , ... Slone Partners welcomed a panel of premier industry ... firm, “Building Value in Precision Medicine: Can We Overcome the Obstacles?” , Michael ... open discussion with expert panelists Troy Cox, CEO of Foundation Medicine, Barbara Weber, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: