Navigation Links
Novel live reporting system to track cells

New findings show an iron storage molecule in the cell can serve as an advanced tool for mapping gene expression. Future gene therapy may use a technique in which non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to track this molecule. The results of this research, conducted by Prof. Michal Neeman of the Weizmann Institute's Biological Regulation Department, were published in the research journal Neoplasia.

Neeman, together with Dr. Batya Cohen of the Institute's Molecular Genetics Department, developed the capacity of the iron-bearing ferritin molecule to serve as a sort of gene "spy" by making genetic modifications to cells. This approach rendered ferritin sensitive to tetracycline (TET), a common antibiotic, so that when TET is present, the ferritin is "off" and when TET is absent, ferritin is "on." Tumor cells with modified ferritin were inserted into living mice and then tracked with MRI. The researchers hampered the expression of ferritin in the inserted cells through the administration of TET. When they stopped the TET, the "switch" turned on, triggering ferritin molecules to increase their numbers, thereby causing an increase in iron uptake within the tumor cells. The contrast between the iron content in these and in the normal surrounding cells showed up in the MRI (which is sensitive to magnetic particles such as iron), effectively identifying the genetically modified cells.

This method grew out of a joint vision that originated 10 years ago in collaboration with the late Dr. Yoav Citri. Ferritin's advantage is that it is visible in MRI without the need for an additional contrast material. This technique has far-reaching implications for monitoring the progress of gene therapy, such as that used to reactivate the body's production of insulin in the treatment of diabetes, because the genes can be "tagged" prior to injection. Therapeutic genes can then be tracked by MRI to ensure the target is reached and the desired activations occur. Pr of. Neeman: "The use of ferritin as a reporter gene would be particularly beneficial in those cases where administration of contrast material is compromised by barriers, including embryonic development and the central nervous system."


'"/>

Source:American Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science


Related biology news :

1. Novel Asthma Study Shows Multiple Genetic Input Required; Single-gene Solution Shot Down
2. Novel technology detects human DNA mutations
3. Novel antiviral technology inhibits RSV infection in mice
4. Novel Enzyme Shows Potential As An Anti-HIV Target
5. Novel Therapy Tested in Mice Could Chase Away Cat Allergies
6. Discovery Could Lead To Novel Approaches In HIV Treatment
7. Novel ultrafast laser detection of cancer cells also may improve understanding of stem cells
8. Research Using Mouse Models Reveals A Novel Key Player In The Initiation Of Colon Cancer
9. Novel gene-silencing nanoparticles shown to inhibit Ewings sarcoma
10. Field of beams - Novel system uses polarized light pulses to reveal crop health
11. Novel compounds show promise as safer, more potent insecticides
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/3/2017)...  Data captured by IsoCode, IsoPlexis Corporation,s ... statistically significant association between the potency of ... objective response of cancer patients post-treatment. The ... cancer patients will respond to CAR-T cell ... to improve both pre-infusion potency testing and cell ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 2017  higi, the health IT company that operates ... America , today announced a Series B investment ... EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition accelerates higi,s strategy ... transform population health activities through the collection and workflow ... higi collects and secures data today on behalf of ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their ... The Global ... CAGR of around 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately ... the market estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today confirmed licensing rights that give it ... Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of VetStem ... The event entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was held ... Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., Chief ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... Calif. , Oct. 10, 2017 SomaGenics ... from the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected ... for profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single cells ... Program highlights the need to accelerate development of approaches ... "New techniques for measuring levels ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... The Pittcon ... awards honoring scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry ... Pittcon 2018, the world’s leading conference and exposition for laboratory science, which will ...
Breaking Biology Technology: