Navigation Links
New Discovery May Help Doctors Treat Infertility

New research suggests that medications commonly referred to as fertility drugs may be ineffective for women who lack a gene called the estrogen receptor beta. The study showed that fertility drugs did not improve ovulation rates in mice that were genetically engineered to lack estrogen receptor beta. The estrogen receptor beta is one of two estrogen receptor proteins which mediate the effects of estrogen hormones and are present throughout the female reproductive tissues. These new data indicate that this receptor plays a critical role in ovulation, and suggests that women who do not have this receptor may benefit more from alternative infertility treatments. The findings are reported in Endocrinology, published in August, 2005.

“What we found is that the beta estrogen receptor plays a role in moving the egg outside the ovary so it can be fertilized,?said Kenneth Korach, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) where the research was conducted. “We never knew before what function this receptor played in reproduction.?/p>

If the results from this animal study are found to be applicable to humans, a simple blood test will be able to provide enough information to determine if a genetic mutation may be altering the function of the estrogen receptor beta. The results of this blood test, coupled with information from other medical tests and evaluations conducted by the physician, will help diagnose infertility and better determine treatment options.

“Dealing with infertility can be emotionally, financially, and physically draining?said Dr. David Schwartz, Director of the NIEHS, a part of the National Institutes of Health, which funded the research. “If we can help couples understand the reasons for their infertility, doctors can further define their treatment options, help them to minimize the expense and risk of taking drugs that may be less effective for them, and increase their chances of having a saf e and healthy child,?he added.

The NIEHS researchers treated normal female mice and female mice that lack estrogen receptor beta with fertility drugs similar to those commonly used by women undergoing fertility treatments. The mice lacking this receptor are more likely to exhibit infertility or subfertility, including producing fewer offspring, or having less frequent pregnancies. Treatment with fertility drugs did not improve ovulation rates in these studies.

Years of study have shown that the hormone estrogen plays an important role in a variety of systems, most especially female reproduction. However, it was generally thought that there was only one receptor, the alpha receptor, that responded to estrogen. It wasn’t until 1996 that the second receptor, estrogen receptor beta, was discovered. The current study provides evidence that the beta receptor plays a more significant role in ovarian function than the alpha receptor. Researchers would like to further their investigation into the role of the beta receptor by studying women already undergoing fertility treatment.

“The tools and animal models necessary to do these types of studies have only recently become available, but are already helping us to better understand the role of estrogen in the ovary,?said John Couse, Ph.D., lead author of the August paper.

An earlier NIEHS study published in the June issue of Endocrinology, used a test tube or in vitro approach, to elucidate the role that estrogen receptors play in ovulation. “The combination of the two different methods, the in vivo and in vitro studies, complement each other nicely and provide more precise answers to the role that the estrogen receptor beta plays in ovulation,?said lead author Judith Emmen, Ph.D.

The estrogen receptor beta is also known to respond to environmental and dietary chemicals that can mimic the effects of estrogen and stimulate the body’s natural hormones. One example is genistein, a common com ponent of soy products. These new studies by Korach and colleagues suggest that such environmental exposures could interact with estrogen receptor beta and possibly alter ovarian function in women.

NIEHS, a component of the National Institutes of Health, supports research to understand the effects of the environment on human health. For more information about reproductive and developmental toxicology and other environmental health topics, please visit our website at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/.


'"/>

Source:NIH


Related biology news :

1. Fundamental Finding Yields Insight into Stem Cells, Cancer; Opens Door to Drug Discovery
2. Discovery of key proteins shape could lead to improved bacterial pneumonia vaccine
3. UCSD Discovery Shows How Embryonic Stem Cells Perform Quality Control Inspections
4. Discovery Could Lead To Novel Approaches In HIV Treatment
5. Discovery Promises Simpler Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease
6. Discovery may lead to better Candidiasis drug
7. Protein Discovery Could Unlock The Secret To Better TB Treatment
8. Discovery clarifies role of peptide in biological clock
9. Eliminate Data Analysis Bottlenecks in Drug Discovery
10. Discovery of New Dopamine Action May Yield Alternative Psychiatric Drugs
11. Discovery could be key to bioterrorism defense
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/11/2016)... , March 11, 2016 ... market research report "Image Recognition Market by Technology (Pattern ... and Advertising), by Deployment Type (On-Premises and Cloud), by ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market is expected ... USD 29.98 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... Fla. , March 9, 2016  Crossmatch ... authentication and enrollment solutions, today announced the addition ... ® Altus multi-factor authentication platform. New ... InfoSec managers to step-up security where it,s needed ... Washington, DC . --> ...
(Date:3/2/2016)... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wzwqtz/global_biometrics ... "Global Biometrics Market in Hospitality Sector 2016-2020" ... , , Global biometrics market in the ... of around 27%   --> ... addition of the  "Global Biometrics Market in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Morris Midwest ... house for regional manufacturers at its Maple Grove, Minnesota technical center, May 11-12. ... Chiron and Trumpf. Almost 20 leading suppliers of tooling, accessories, software and ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... NSK) (OTCPink: NSKQB) ( Frankfurt : ... ihre Pressemitteilung vom 13. August 2015 die Genehmigung ... Finanzen um zusätzliche 200.000.000 Einheiten auf 400.000.000 Einheiten ... zu bringen. Davon wurden 157.900.000 Einheiten mit dem ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... A compact ... Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in existing third-party MRI systems. PET ... treatments in small animal subjects. Simultaneous PET/MRI imaging offers a solution to many ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... , ... April 27, 2016 , ... ... Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP as an associate in the firm’s Intellectual Property ... international electrical, mechanical and electromechanical patent applications. He has an electrical engineering and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: