Navigation Links
Molecule that usually protects infection-fighting cells may cause plaque deposits inside arteries

A molecule that usually protects the body's infection-fighting cells might also contribute to fatty buildups that coat arteries and lead to heart disease, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

The molecule, called apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage or AIM, inhibits cell death in macrophages, which circulate in the bloodstream and help the body fend off infection and foreign substances. The AIM-protected macrophages go on to encourage buildup of fats on the interior walls of arteries, according to Dr. Toru Miyazaki, senior author of a study that appears in the March issue of the journal Cell Metabolism.

"We found that AIM is highly expressed in certain macrophages and that lack of AIM dramatically decreased early atherosclerotic lesion development in mice," Dr. Miyazaki said. "These results may imply a novel therapeutic application of AIM regulation for prevention of atherosclerosis in the future. Most importantly and attractively for patients, this approach may not need dietary restriction."

Dr. Miyazaki, associate professor in the Center for Immunology and of pathology, and his colleagues first discovered the protective role of AIM six years ago. In the current study, scientists exposed mice lacking AIM to a fatty diet that would normally induce atherosclerosis.

After several weeks, researchers found little to no atherosclerotic lesions. Comparatively, in mice that had normal AIM function, there was marked presence of plaque deposits in the arteries following a diet of high-fat food.

"This was dramatic evidence that showed suppressing AIM function translates into prevention of atherosclerosis," Dr. Miyazaki said.

Atherosclerosis, known as "hardening of the arteries," occurs when the inside walls of an artery become thicker and less elastic.

This narrows the space for blood flow and can lead to angina and heart attacks in some people. Fatty buildups occur on the inner lining of an artery and grad ually thicken into a plaque. As plaque grows, it narrows the artery more and more. When the plaque ruptures, blood clots form that can block the artery entirely.

Low-density lipoprotein is transported inside arteries by macrophages, which engulf the cholesterol through a process called oxidation. Macrophages produce pro-inflammatory substances, which cause a secondary effect, encouraging other cells to accumulate and worsen plaque buildup in arteries.

"The oxidized lipids are cleared out by macrophage cells, but the lipids themselves are very toxic to cells and promote apoptosis (cell death)," Dr. Miyazaki said. "Therefore AIM production is a self-defense mechanism for macrophage cells, but interestingly, is in turn detrimental for the body."

Atherosclerosis is a contributing factor to a number of cardiovascular diseases ?the No. 1 cause of death among people in the United States. It is also highly associated with other risk factors such as smoking, obesity and diets high in fat and cholesterol.


'"/>

Source:University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas


Related biology news :

1. DNA Molecules Used To Assemble Nanoparticles
2. Duke Chemists Isolating Individual Molecules Of Toxic Protein In Alzheimers, Parkinsons Disease
3. Successful Test Of Single Molecule Switch Opens The Door To Biomolecular Electronics
4. Touching Molecules With Your Bare Hands
5. Team Invents Device For Weighing Individual Molecules
6. Missing Receptor Molecule Causes Tumor Growth
7. Molecule by molecule, new assay shows real-time gene activity
8. Molecule does more than slice and dice RNA
9. Molecules in blood foretell development of preeclampsia
10. Molecule that destroys bone also protects it, new research shows
11. Bound for destruction: Ubiquitination protects against improper Notch signaling
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017  Veratad Technologies, LLC ( ... online age and identity verification solutions, announced today they ... Conference 2017, May 15 thru May 17, 2017, in ... and International Trade Center. Identity impacts ... and in today,s quickly evolving digital world, defining identity ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in ... media edge server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec ... provided by Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming ... NAB show at the Las Vegas Convention ... Click ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period 2017-2021. ... been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from ... prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... CA, USA (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... to take place on 7th and 8th June 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The ... influencers as well as several distinguished CEOs, board directors and government officials from around ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... the Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. ... The Institute of Cancer Research, London ... use MMprofiler™ with SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients ... trial known as MUK nine . The University of ... trial, which is partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Singh ... orphan drug designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of ... SBT-100 is able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... program has won a US2020 STEM Mentoring Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program ... in Volunteer Experience from US2020. , US2020’s mission is to change the trajectory ...
Breaking Biology Technology: