Navigation Links
Melanoma vaccine strategy shows promise in laboratory experiments

A novel approach to creating a vaccine to treat melanoma has demonstrated promising effectiveness in a new laboratory study led by researchers at The Wistar Institute. About a third of melanoma patients might benefit from such a vaccine. The study appears in the current issue of Cancer Research.

In the study, the scientists used a small protein called a peptide found in approximately 70 percent of melanomas, but not in normal cells, to stimulate immune cells called killer T cells to attack the melanoma cells. Another type of immune cell called a monocyte was used to present the peptide, BRAFV600E, to the killer T cells to trigger their attack on the melanoma cells.

"In our experiments, we saw a strong cancer-killing immune response when killer T cells are stimulated with this peptide," says Dorothee Herlyn, D.V.M., senior author on the study and a professor in the Immunology Program and Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program at Wistar. "The results emphasize the potential of this approach for creating an effective melanoma vaccine, and we hope to move toward human clinical trials as soon as possible."

A substantial proportion of melanoma patients, about 50 percent, have killer T cells able to recognize the BRAFV600E peptide. Combining the prevalence of the peptide among melanoma patients ?about 70 percent ?with the number of patients whose immune cells are able to respond to the peptide suggests that a vaccine based on BRAFV600E could treat approximately a third of all melanoma patients.

Herlyn adds that the specificity of the peptide ?the fact that it is found only in melanoma cells, not normal cells ?suggests that the toxicity of any vaccine based on the peptide would be minimal. Killer T cells sparked into action by the vaccine would target only the cancer cells, sparing healthy cells entirely.

Looking ahead to possible human clinical trials, another member of the scientific team, University of Pennsylvania assistant pro fessor Brian Czerniecki, M.D., Ph.D., is working to prepare yet another type of immune cell, called a dendritic cell, to present the BRAFV600E peptide to killer T cells. Dendritic cells have as their primary job the presentation of foreign materials to the immune system, and the expectation is that dendritic cells presenting the BRAFV600E peptide would trigger the killer T cells even more effectively than the monocyte cells used in the current study. Indeed, such prepared dendritic cells might serve as the basis for a treatment vaccine that could be taken into human clinical trials.

Herlyn is senior author on the Cancer Research study. The lead author is Rajasekharan Somasundaram, also at Wistar. The additional Wistar coauthors are Rolf Swoboda, Laura Caputo, and Laszlo Otvos (now at Temple University). The remaining coauthors are Barbara Weber, Patricia Volpe, Patricia van Belle, Susan Hotz, David E. Elder, Lynn Schuchter, DuPont Guerry, and Brian J. Czerniecki of the University of Pennsylvania, and Francesco M. Marincola with the National Institutes of Health.


'"/>

Source:The Wistar Institute


Related biology news :

1. NCI Researchers Confirm the Effectiveness of Immunotherapy Approach to Treating Melanoma
2. Research advances quest for HIV-1 vaccine
3. A much-needed shot in the arm for HIV vaccine development
4. Discovery of key proteins shape could lead to improved bacterial pneumonia vaccine
5. Gene vaccine for Alzheimers disease shows promising results
6. Influenza vaccine uses insect cells to speed development
7. Norovirus, AIDS vaccine and Hepatitis Virus
8. HIV vaccine trial breaks ground for future research
9. Live vaccines more effective against horse herpes virus
10. NIAID begins clinical trial of West Nile virus vaccine
11. Designing vaccines by computer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... Fla. , April 11, 2017 ... and secure authentication solutions, today announced that it ... Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop ... Thor program. "Innovation has been a ... IARPA,s Thor program will allow us to innovate ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... SEATTLE , April 5, 2017  The Allen ... the Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic ... large-scale 3D imaging data, the first application of deep ... edited human stem cell lines and a growing suite ... the platform for these and future publicly available resources ...
(Date:3/30/2017)...  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com will host the ... hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in Redmond, Washington ... developing health and wellness apps that provide a unique, ... is the first hackathon for personal genomics and ... in the genomics, tech and health industries are sending ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Personal eye wash is a basic first aid supply for any work environment, but most ... you rinse first if a dangerous substance enters both eyes? It’s one less decision, and ... unique dual eye piece. , “Whether its dirt and debris, or an acid or alkali, ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Proscia Inc ., ... a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ready?” with Dr. ... best practices and how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes an increase in ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ROTTERDAM, the Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, ... that The Institute of Cancer Research, London ... will use MMprofiler™ with SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify ... high-risk trial known as MUK nine . The University ... this trial, which is partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... A new study published ... frozen and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer cycles. The multi-center ... success. , After comparing the results from the fresh and frozen transfer cohorts, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: