Navigation Links
Mayo Clinic Cancer Center: Harnessing the measles virus to attack cancer

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center has opened a new clinical study using a vaccine strain of the measles virus to attack recurrent glioblastoma multiforme, a largely untreatable brain tumor. This is the second of several pending molecular medicine studies in patients using measles to kill cancer.

"We are looking at better ways to treat some of the most lethal cancers," says Eva Galanis, M.D., oncologist and lead researcher on the glioblastoma multiforme project in the measles virus investigation. "We have shown in the laboratory and in several animal models that measles virus strains can significantly shrink glioma tumors and prolong animal survival. It is very rewarding to see this work maturing to the point of now being able to offer this novel and promising treatment approach to patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme." She also reports that toxicology studies, conducted in conjunction with Federal Drug Administration, showed an excellent safety profile.

Mayo Clinic is unique in its pursuit of oncolytic measles vaccine strains for cancer treatment, and the research has grown from the most basic laboratory science to the sophisticated therapy being tested today in several tumor types, including glioblastoma multiforme, recurrent ovarian cancer and multiple myeloma.

Many cancer cells, including glioblastoma cells, overexpress a specific protein, CD46, which allows tumor cells to evade destruction by the immune system. Strains of the measles virus, including the one in this study, seek out this protein, entering the glioblastoma multiforme tumor. Upon entry, the virus begins to spread, infecting nearby tumor cells and fusing them, which augments the effect of infection and increases cancer cell death.

Mayo's research team has an ongoing clinical study for ovarian cancer. "We've seen early evidence of biologic activity," says Dr. Galanis. "The ovarian cancer trial, though in its early stages, has demonstrated safety, which n ow allows administration of higher and potentially even more potent viral doses."

The glioblastoma multiforme study, which opened today, is designed to test the safety of the virus for the treatment of gliomas and enable biological monitoring of anti-tumor activity.

"The measles virus we are using in the glioblastoma multiforme trial provides a noninvasive way to monitor viral effects in the tumor," says Dr. Galanis. "When the virus replicates, it produces a marker protein that we can detect in the blood using a clinically-available assay. Repeat brain tumor biopsies for this purpose are not always safe or ethically justified. Instead we can monitor viral propagation in the tumor with a blood test, allowing us to adjust the dosage to increase the likelihood of therapeutic benefit."

Eligible candidates for the therapy will have glioblastoma multiforme that has progressed after surgery and radiation therapy, and be candidates for surgery. They also must be immune to measles, either having had the disease or been vaccinated against it.

In the 1970s, measles infections were observed to cause regression of pre-existing cancer tumors in children. This information was noted, but nothing was done to study this phenomenon until the late 1990s, when under the direction of Stephen Russell, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic Cancer Center's Molecular Medicine Program began looking into it, resulting in the current study and other related projects.

"Mayo is the perfect place to develop a therapeutic virus because you need a wide range of expertise," says Dr. Russell. "From basic scientists who create and test the vaccine strain to those who determine the best way to manufacture a safe biological delivery mechanism, and finally, to clinicians who understand the science and develop guidelines by which the study is conducted and correctly carried out, our team is one of the best. Everything we do focuses on achieving the greatest benefit for the patient."

Later this fall, Dr. Russell's team plans to open a clinical study to test the effectiveness of another version of the measles virus on multiple myeloma. The researchers also are looking at ways to use the measles virus to combat breast and pancreatic cancer.


'"/>

Source:Mayo Clinic


Related biology news :

1. Mayo Clinic Researchers Create Obedient Virus; First Step To Use Measles Virus Against Cancer
2. Chronic Sinus Infection Thought To Be Tissue Issue, Mayo Clinic Scientists Show Its Snot
3. Clinical trial to test stem cell approach for children with brain injury
4. Mayo Clinic collaboration discovers protein amplifies DNA injury signals
5. Mayo Clinic researchers challenge sepsis theory
6. Mayo Clinic researchers discover cancer cells may move via wave stimulation
7. Mayo Clinic study finds two genes predict outcome for breast cancer patients
8. Mayo Clinic collaboration mining of ancient herbal text leads to potential new anti-bacterial drug
9. Mayo Clinic study suggests that a central nervous system viral infection can lead to memory deficits
10. Mayo Clinic: Gene expression profiling not quite perfected in predicting lung cancer prognosis
11. Adding Radiation Therapy To Chemotherapy Improves Survival In Patients With High-risk Breast Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2016)... NEW YORK , May 16, 2016   ... authentication solutions, today announced the opening of an IoT ... to strengthen and expand the development of embedded ... provides an unprecedented level of convenience and security with ... to authenticate one,s identity aside from DNA. EyeLock,s platform ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 28, 2016 First quarter 2016:   ... compared with the first quarter of 2015 The gross ... M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin was 40% (-13) ... Cash flow from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) , ... is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin for ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... DUBLIN , April 15, 2016 ... of the,  "Global Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160330/349511LOGO ) , ,The global gait ... CAGR of 13.98% during the period 2016-2020. ... movement angles, which can be used to compute ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... PHILADELPHIA , June 27, 2016  Liquid ... today announced the funding of a Sponsored Research ... study circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients.  ... changes in CTC levels correlate with clinical outcomes ... therapies. These data will then be employed to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... While the majority of commercial spectrophotometers and fluorometers use the z-dimension ... are higher end machines that use the more unconventional z-dimension of 20mm. Z-dimension ... bottom of the cuvette holder. , FireflySci has developed several Agilent flow cell ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the development of novel compounds designed to target ... compound, napabucasin, has been granted Orphan Drug Designation ... in the treatment of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal ... cancer stemness inhibitor designed to inhibit cancer stemness ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... Charm Sciences, Inc. is pleased to ... AOAC Research Institute approval 061601. , “This is another AOAC-RI approval of the ... Vice President of Regulatory and Industrial Affairs. “The Peel Plate methods perform comparably ...
Breaking Biology Technology: