Navigation Links
HIV mortality in India drops with introduction of generic antiretroviral therapy

The survival rate of HIV-infected patients in India has risen in response to a 20-fold drop in the price of antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to an article in the Nov. 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, now available online. The introduction of generic drugs into the country has encouraged people to seek HIV treatment because of the cheaper cost, the article states.

Many of the more than 5 million HIV-infected people living in India have been unable to obtain treatment due to the high cost. With the introduction of generic ART into India in 2000, the price of HIV drugs fell from $778 per month to $100 per month, and eventually declined even further to just $33 per month in 2003.

The drastically lower cost of ART sparked a rise in the number of people seeking--and obtaining--treatment for their infection. Researchers in India and Rhode Island found that in 1996, just 13 percent of the Indian patients who qualified for ART were able to afford it. But that number rose to 22 percent in 2000, and reached 44 percent in 2003.

With the availability of much-needed drugs came better health. Opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis, a common problem for immunocompromised patients, occur at a much lower rate in those receiving ART and its highly active drug counterpart, HAART. Accessible drugs have led, in part, to an 80 percent decline in HIV-related deaths in India between 1997 and 2003.

Despite ART's importance in improving HIV-infected people's health, it can also cause problems. Adverse events, such as rash, nausea, diarrhea, headache and anemia, can arise from antiretroviral use. But are the side effects serious enough to discourage patients from continuing ART? "No. Benefits of HAART outweigh the toxicities, based on our experience in our patients," said lead author Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, PhD, of the YRG Centre for AIDS Research and Education in Chennai.

Along with the much cheaper price of ART--which can be expected to drop even further, said Dr. Kumarasamy--comes further encouragement for Indian HIV patients to seek treatment. "Voluntary counseling centers are being set up in public hospitals and in centers where persons with high risk for HIV seek medical attention," Dr. Kumarasamy said. Such centers offer pre- and post-test counseling, which includes medical counseling on HIV care, like ART. Making HIV-infected people aware of affordable treatment options is an important additional step toward curbing the spread of a deadly disease in a resource-poor country.


'"/>

Source:Infectious Diseases Society of America


Related biology news :

1. Oil spills and climate change double the mortality rate of British seabirds
2. US infant mortality rate fails to improve
3. Quitting smoking reduces risk of lung cancer mortality by 70 percent
4. Indias smoking gun: Dino-killing eruptions
5. Genetic analysis of Asian elephants in India reveals some surprises
6. Alcoholism, smoking and genetics among Plains American Indians
7. Researchers make progress in studying genetic traits of India-born populations
8. New technologies coming too fast for Indian farmers
9. Ring-like formations in drying DNA drops could affect hybridization studies
10. FDA approves more generic AIDS drugs
11. International HIV/AIDS trial finds continuous antiretroviral therapy superior to episodic therapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2017)...   Bridge Patient Portal , an enterprise ... EMR Systems , an electronic medical record solutions ... established a partnership to build an interface between ... Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution (CPS), Centricity ... new integrations will allow healthcare delivery networks using ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... -- NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, 2017 ... ... Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com  under ... http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... Foundation President Andi Purple announced Dr. Suneel I. Sheikh, the co-founder, CEO ... ASTER Labs ), Inc. has been selected for membership in ARCS Alumni ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... INDIANAPOLIS , Oct. 11, 2017  VMS BioMarketing, a ... of a nationwide oncology Clinical Nurse Educator (CNE) network, which ... growing need for communication among health care professionals to enhance ... physicians, nurses, office staff, and other health care professionals to ... for breast cancer. ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... DIEGO, CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... as part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look ... its reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... 2017 SomaGenics announced the receipt of a ... RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to be the first commercially ... microRNAs) from single cells using NGS methods. The NIH,s ... accelerate development of approaches to analyze the heterogeneity of ... techniques for measuring levels of mRNAs in individual cells ...
Breaking Biology Technology: