Navigation Links
HIV-infected adults in Botswana respond positively to ARV therapy public treatment program

With preliminary results from a study in Botswana, Harvard School of Public Health researchers have found that people with HIV-1 subtype C in resource-poor settings, who receive antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, can achieve comparable results to those in the developed world. A fully supported health care delivery system and infrastructure help ensure this success, according to data published in November 2005 issue of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS).

More than 95 percent of HIV-infected people live in resource-poor nations -- and only a fraction of the people have access to the potentially lifesaving treatment. This study evaluated the effectiveness of combination ARV treatment in decreasing HIV disease and death. With more than one year of follow-up for clinical and laboratory outcomes and two years of follow-up for survival estimates, the majority of enrolled patients on ARV treatment experienced favorable clinical outcomes, including improved CD4 counts, decreased viral load and weight gain comparable with other successful care and treatment programs in the developed world.

"This data confirms what we are starting to see throughout the developing world. Patients will do fine regardless of social and economic status, provided the necessary infrastructure and funding are in place," said Richard Marlink, M.D., senior author of the article and professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).

The clinical data was collected from a public-private partnership between the Botswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative Partnership for HIV Research and Education (BHP) and the Infectious Disease Care Clinic (IDCC) at Princess Marina Hospital and funded through Bristol-Myers Squibbs' Secure the Future initiative. Initiated in April 2001, this public sector treatment program led to the development of the Botswana's national program and provided the first clinica l outcomes data among ARV-treated adults in Botswana.

"These results underscore the importance of monitoring not only clinical outcomes, but also ARV drug tolerability and toxicity as well," said William Wester, M.D., lead author of the article and research associate, Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease at HSPH. "Patients will respond to ARV therapy, but especially early on in their ARV treatment course, drug toxicity may significantly affect ones' quality of life and drug adherence rates." Results from the study have led to changes in the drug regimen to improve patients' drug adherence and prognosis.

In addition to creating the first public sector ARV clinic, Harvard has used the grant received in 2000 through the Secure the Future program to:

Ø Help build the initial HIV Reference Laboratory in Botswana; and

Ø Initiate the groundbreaking "Adult Antiretroviral Treatment and Drug Resistance Study to examine the three main reasons patients fail ARV therapy: drug resistance, tolerability and adherence. This study is also called the "Tshepo" Study, "Tshepo" is the word for "hope" in Setswana. This study was recently extended through 2007, making it the largest and longest running adult ARV treatment research study in the region.


'"/>

Source:Harvard School of Public Health


Related biology news :

1. Zinc supplements safe for HIV-infected children
2. Low-cost drug gaining favor for use in HIV-infected children in poor countries
3. New study shows benefit of early therapy in HIV-infected infants
4. Meth promotes spread of virus in HIV-infected users
5. H5N1 avian flu virus vaccine induces immune responses in healthy adults
6. Confidence in memory performance helps older adults remember
7. Genes affecting blood pressure change as children become adults
8. Suicide risk does not increase when adults start using antidepressants, study finds
9. One-third of adults with diabetes still dont know they have it
10. Sleep deprivation doubles risks of obesity in both children and adults
11. Brain regions do not communicate efficiently in adults with autism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric Vehicle Access System ... over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 million by 2025. ... forecasts for all the given segments on global as well as ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 21, 2017 Vigilant ... company serving law enforcement agencies, announced today the appointment ... as director of public safety business development. ... law enforcement experience, including a focus on the aviation ... his most recent position, Mr. Sheridan served as the ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... , Australia , March 9, ... study data at the prestigious World Lung Imaging Workshop ... Andreas Fouras , was invited to deliver the ... pulmonary medicine. This globally recognised event brings together leaders ... share the latest developments in lung imaging. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Advanced Polymer ... hire of Dr. Sigmund “Sig” Floyd as Vice President ? Global Business Development. ... development activities. , “Dr. Floyd’s career has spanned 30 years in the chemicals ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues, bones, even whole organs to ... vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. , Current ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Calif. , March 22, 2017  UBM ... proud to announce their extended partnership and the ... be headlined by the 21 st Annual ... Boston, taking place May 3-4, 2017. ... Medical Technology Association (ADVAMED) President and CEO, ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... JERUSALEM , March 22, 2017 ... ( www.oramed.com ), ... of oral drug delivery systems, announced today that ... Officer, will deliver a presentation titled, "Oral Insulin ... upcoming Cambridge Healthtech Institute,s Oligonucleotide and Peptide Therapeutics ...
Breaking Biology Technology: