Navigation Links
Global map shows new patterns of extinction risk

The most detailed world map of mammals, birds and amphibians ever produced shows that endangered species from these groups do not inhabit the same geographical areas, says new research published today.

Contrary to conservationists' previous assumptions, the map shows conclusively that geographical areas with a high concentration of endangered species from one group, do not necessarily have high numbers from the others. This new finding has far-reaching implications for conservation planning by governments and NGOs, and their decisions about where to focus conservation spending. These decisions have typically been based on the assumption that investing in an area known to have a high concentration of endangered birds, for example, will mean that large numbers of endangered mammal and amphibian species will also be protected. The new study shows that basing conservation decisions on just one type of animal can be very misleading.

The study, out in today's issue of Nature, is the culmination of many decades of work by field biologists and analysts, during which the planet was divided up into 100km x 100km grids, and all mammal, bird and amphibian species within each grid square were counted, using a variety of pre-existing, but never-before combined, records. The result is a comprehensive worldwide map of all species in these groups, on a finer scale than ever before.

Professor Ian Owens, one of the paper's authors from Imperial College London's Division of Biology, and the Natural Environment Research Council's Centre for Population Biology, said: "For the first time ever this global mapping has divided the planet up into small grid squares to obtain a really detailed picture of biodiversity. By looking at the numbers of endangered mammals, birds and amphibians in these squares, we have been able to see how this real picture varies from assumptions that have previously been made about global biodiversity of endangered species."

P rofessor Owens adds that this geographical discrepancy in hotspots of endangered species from different groups can be explained by the different factors that threaten mammals, birds and amphibians: "Endangered bird species are often at risk because their habitats are being destroyed. However, different factors entirely may affect mammals such as tigers which are under threat from poachers, and amphibians which are being diminished by diseases brought into their habitat by non-native fish.

"This means that even if a mountainous area has a real problem with endangered amphibians in its creeks and rivers, mammal and bird species in the same area might be flourishing. It's really important not to assume that there are simply a number of hotspots across the globe where everything living there is endangered ?the picture is far more complicated, with mammal, bird and amphibian numbers being threatened by different things, in different locations."

Examples of geographical locations in which the distribution of endangered species is different include:

  • New Zealand is a hot spot for threatened birds because of the danger posed by introduced rats and cats.
  • Mammals are highly threatened across eastern Africa due to hunting and the bush meat trade
  • The tropical, rainforest-clad mountains of northern Australia are home to many declining frog species, although the precise causes of these declines often remain enigmatic.


Source:Imperial College London

Related biology news :

1. Global analysis of membrane proteins
2. Global warming increases oyster sensitivity to pollution
3. Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative funds Yale project
4. Global study shows all tobacco bad for the heart
5. Global warming may warrant new approaches to ecosystem restoration
6. Global warming may have damaged coral reefs forever
7. Global malaria map key weapon in fight against malaria, scientists say
8. Global changes alter the timing of plant growth, scientists say
9. Global sunscreen has likely thinned, report NASA scientists
10. Global survey of lizards reveals greater abundance of animals on islands than on mainland ecosystems
11. Genome of deadly amoeba shows surprising complexity, evidence of lateral gene transfer
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015  BIOCLAIM announced today that is has ... Innovation Awards:  Healthcare Edition, an awards program from ... FierceHealthcare , and FierceMobileHealthcare ... the category of "Privacy and Cybersecurity." ... --> Photo - ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , Nov. 26, 2015 Research and Markets ... "Capacitive Fingerprint Sensors - Technology and Patent Infringement ... --> --> Fingerprint sensors ... in smartphones. The fingerprint sensor vendor Idex forecasts an ... units in mobile devices and of the fingerprint sensor ...
(Date:11/20/2015)... -- NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or the "Company"), ... commerce market and creator of the Wocket® smart wallet, ... interviewed on The RedChip Money Report television ... Bloomberg Europe , Bloomberg Asia, Bloomberg Australia, and ... ) ("NXT-ID" or the "Company"), a biometric authentication company ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... The American Society of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, AAGL, ... will join fellow surgeons in the shared pursuit of “advancing minimally invasive ... founder of Plano Urogynecology Associates and Fellow of the American College of ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... , ... December 01, 2015 , ... Matthew “Tex” VerMilyea, ... post, VerMilyea will oversee all IVF lab procedures as well as continue ... preservation. , “We traveled 7,305 miles to Auckland, New Zealand to bring home a ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... , December 1, 2015 ... addition of the  "2016 U.K. Virology and ... Forecasts for 100 Tests, Supplier Shares by ...  report to their offering.  --> ... the  "2016 U.K. Virology and Bacteriology Testing ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Global ... practitioners and aesthetics professionals from Central America and abroad for the first Iberoamerican ... City, Panama Feb. 17-19, 2016. Testart will present and discuss new trends in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: