Navigation Links
Genome study of beneficial microbe may help boost plant health

In a study expected to greatly benefit crop plants, scientists have deciphered the genome of a root- and seed-dwelling bacterium that protects plants from diseases.

The research provides clues to better explain how the helpful microbe, Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5, naturally safeguards roots and seeds from infection by harmful microbes that cause plant diseases. The genome paper will be published in Nature Biotechnology and was scheduled to be posted online on June 26.

"The genome sequence has helped us identify new chemical pathways that the microbe apparently uses to create what are known as 'secondary metabolites' ?possibly including new antibiotic compounds," says Ian Paulsen. He led the sequencing at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), Rockville, Md., and is the study's first author.

The use of naturally-occurring, beneficial microbes such as P. fluorescens to control plant pathogens is called "biological control." That method is gaining momentum as a way to grow healthy plants without using synthetic fungicides. In all, about three dozen beneficial microbes are currently used as an environmentally-friendly way to fight plant diseases.

Joyce E. Loper, senior author of the genome paper and an expert on P. fluorescens Pf-5, predicts that the new genomic data will help scientists more quickly develop new ways to boost the effectiveness of beneficial microbes in fighting plant diseases.

"This genomic sequence reveals previously unknown traits of P. fluorescens that increase its potential for biological control," says Loper. She is a plant pathologist with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and is based at Oregon State University, Corvallis. The P. fluorescens genome was sequenced at TIGR and analyzed by scientists there and at ARS and Oregon State University, with contributions by researchers at Rutgers, Washington State University and the University of Arizona. The project was funded by a grant from the USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service.

The article in Nature Biotechnology presents the first complete genome sequence of a biological control agent for combating plant diseases.

P. fluorescens Pf-5 was discovered two decades ago by Charles R. Howell, a plant pathologist with the ARS in Texas, who showed that the microbe suppressed two major cotton diseases. Since then, plant pathologists around the world have used this strain as a laboratory model to study beneficial microbes.

Paulsen says the P. fluorescens project also pioneered a new methodology. This novel approach relies on the analysis of repeated regions of the DNA sequence to help identify segments of the genome that appear to have been transferred from other microbes or viruses, known as phages, that infect bacteria.

Says Paulsen: "We found exciting evidence that P. fluorescens may have acquired new clusters of genes, called genomic islands, by means of lateral transfer from phages or other microbes."


'"/>

Source:TIGR


Related biology news :

1. Genome of deadly amoeba shows surprising complexity, evidence of lateral gene transfer
2. Affymetrix Unveils Plans to Double Plant and Animal Genome Microarray Offering
3. Genome-wide mouse study yields link to human leukemia
4. New Study from Affymetrix Laboratories Points to Changing View of How Genome Works
5. Multiple Campylobacter Genomes Sequenced
6. Analysis Of Human Genome To Predict The Development Of Illnesses
7. Whole genome promoter mapping - Human Genome Project v2.0?
8. Candida albicans Genome Fully Annotated
9. Genome Sequence for Haemophilus Influenzae Completed
10. NHGRI Selects 13 More Organisms for Genome Sequencing
11. First Whole Genome Map of Genetic Variability in Parkinson’s Disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 NXT-ID, ... security technology company, announces the appointment of independent Directors Mr. ... to its Board of Directors, furthering the company,s corporate ... ... NXT-ID, we look forward to their guidance and benefiting from ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017 Today HYPR ... that the server component of the HYPR platform is ... providing the end-to-end security architecture that empowers biometric authentication ... HYPR has already secured over 15 million users across ... manufacturers of connected home product suites and physical access ...
(Date:4/3/2017)...  Data captured by IsoCode, IsoPlexis Corporation,s ... statistically significant association between the potency of ... objective response of cancer patients post-treatment. The ... cancer patients will respond to CAR-T cell ... to improve both pre-infusion potency testing and cell ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... , ... Diversity focused business accelerator, The Refinery , announced today they ... the top technology-driven, women-led startups in Boston, MA, New Haven/Hamden, CT, and Newark, NJ. ... going on that week – in Boston, it will be part of the City ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... of a study examining the effects of exoskeleton-assisted walking on gait parameters ... (SCI). The article, "Neuromechanical adaptations during a robotic powered exoskeleton assisted walking ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... management solutions, announced today the opening of an office in Taipei, Taiwan. This ... Greater China region, while developing new relationships in the region. Located in the ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... largest group of funded early-stage tech companies. “Grit” author Angela Duckworth and her ... joining the ic@3401 community is Cooley, an international law firm with decades of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: