Navigation Links
Genetically engineered animals help in scientific research that may benefit children

The recent use of genetically modified mice and rats in combination with an animal model of obstructive nephropathy, a type of renal disease, has given researchers new insight in the development of kidney disease. This research is published in the September issue of Kidney International.

"Chronic kidney disease is difficult to study since it takes a fair amount of time to install," states Joost P. Schanstra, Ph.D. of the Instituit Louis Bugnard inFrance. "This animal model has the advantage of mimicking in a short time the different stages of chronic kidney disease. The combination of genetically engineered animals and this animal model has helped us to decide which molecules to study, or which might be interesting targets for drug development in human chronic kidney disease."

Obstructive nephropathy or obstructive uropathy, the kidney disease on which this animal model is based, is frequently found in children and is the first cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). According to the article, ESRD represents 16.1% of all pediatric transplantations in North America.


'"/>

Source:Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Genetically modified natural killer immune cells attack, kill leukemia cells
2. Genetically modified rice in China benefits farmers health, study finds
3. Genetically Modified Natural Killer Immune Cells Attack, Kill Leukemia Cells
4. Genetically modified maize not found in southern Mexico
5. Genetically engineered mosquitoes show resistance to dengue fever virus
6. Genetically altered mice no longer like cocaine
7. Genetically engineered blood protein can be used to split water into oxygen and hydrogen
8. Insects develop resistance to engineered crops
9. Bioengineered tissue implants regenerate damaged knee cartilage
10. New engineered drug may offer prolonged arthritis relief
11. Can engineered immune cells stop AIDS?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com ... Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... will focus on developing health and wellness apps that ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon for ... world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and health ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 ... Biometrics), Hardware (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video ... and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... in 2016 and is projected to reach USD 75.64 ... 2017 and 2022. The base year considered for the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing ... Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected ... 29.63% between 2017 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 15, 2017 , ... ... encrypted shopping cart. Now mobile responsive, the new website makes it easy to ... anywhere in between. Users can now find detailed product information, educational industry content ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... August 14, 2017 , ... ... Mobile in Clinical Trials event, which will take place on September 6, 2017 ... Daniel Karlin, MD , Head of Experimental Medicine, Informatics, and Regulatory Strategy, Pfizer ...
(Date:8/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Algenist continues to disrupt the skincare industry with today’s debut ... , Collagen is the key structural element skin needs to maintain its youthful appearance ... First to market with proprietary collagen water active , ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... August 09, 2017 , ... ... next week-- as students. From August 14th through the 16th, the University City ... debuted in the summer of 2016, provides Philadelphia-based middle school educators an opportunity ...
Breaking Biology Technology: