Navigation Links
Genetically engineered animals help in scientific research that may benefit children

The recent use of genetically modified mice and rats in combination with an animal model of obstructive nephropathy, a type of renal disease, has given researchers new insight in the development of kidney disease. This research is published in the September issue of Kidney International.

"Chronic kidney disease is difficult to study since it takes a fair amount of time to install," states Joost P. Schanstra, Ph.D. of the Instituit Louis Bugnard inFrance. "This animal model has the advantage of mimicking in a short time the different stages of chronic kidney disease. The combination of genetically engineered animals and this animal model has helped us to decide which molecules to study, or which might be interesting targets for drug development in human chronic kidney disease."

Obstructive nephropathy or obstructive uropathy, the kidney disease on which this animal model is based, is frequently found in children and is the first cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). According to the article, ESRD represents 16.1% of all pediatric transplantations in North America.


Source:Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Genetically modified natural killer immune cells attack, kill leukemia cells
2. Genetically modified rice in China benefits farmers health, study finds
3. Genetically Modified Natural Killer Immune Cells Attack, Kill Leukemia Cells
4. Genetically modified maize not found in southern Mexico
5. Genetically engineered mosquitoes show resistance to dengue fever virus
6. Genetically altered mice no longer like cocaine
7. Genetically engineered blood protein can be used to split water into oxygen and hydrogen
8. Insects develop resistance to engineered crops
9. Bioengineered tissue implants regenerate damaged knee cartilage
10. New engineered drug may offer prolonged arthritis relief
11. Can engineered immune cells stop AIDS?
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/12/2015)... 11, 2015   Growing need for low-cost, ... has been paving the way for use of ... discrete analytes in clinical, agricultural, environmental, food and ... used in medical applications, however, their adoption is ... to continuous emphasis on improving product quality and ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... , Nov. 10, 2015 ... behavioral biometrics that helps to identify and verify ... Signature is considered as the secure and accurate ... identification of a particular individual because each individual,s ... accurate results especially when dynamic signature of an ...
(Date:11/4/2015)... , November 4, 2015 ... market report published by Transparency Market Research "Home Security Solutions ... and Forecast 2015 - 2022", the global home security solutions ... bn by 2022. The market is estimated to expand ... from 2015 to 2022. Rising security needs among customers ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The United States Golf Association (USGA) today ... Green Section Award. Presented annually since 1961, the USGA Green Section Award recognizes an ... turfgrass. , Clarke, of Iselin, N.J., is an extension specialist of turfgrass ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) closed ... events for pharmaceutical manufacturing: 2015 Annual Meeting. The conference took place in Philadelphia, ... number of attendees in more than a decade. , “The 2015 Annual ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... The Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), led by its Executive Council, has officially ... to represent the First–Person View (FPV) racing community. , FPV racing has exploded in ... racing and several new model aviation pilots have joined the community because of their ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... FRANCISCO , Nov. 24, 2015  Twist ... announced that Emily Leproust, Ph.D., Twist Bioscience chief ... Jaffray Healthcare Conference on December 1, 2015 at ... Hotel in New York City. --> ... . Twist Bioscience is on Twitter. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: