Navigation Links
Gene increases risk of tuberculosis

A study in the December 19 issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine identifies a small genetic change that increases the odds of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Pedro Flores-Villanueva and his colleagues at the University of Texas Health Center (Tyler, TX) studied groups of patients in Mexico and Korea and found that individuals who carry this genetic change were more likely to develop disease when infected with TB-causing bacteria.

Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, are on the rise, with an estimated eight million new infections and two million TB-induced deaths occurring annually. But not all people who are exposed to this bug become ill -- a phenomenon largely explained by genetic differences that make some individuals more prone to developing disease than others. Indeed, a recent scientific study found that a particular region on the human chromosome 17 was associated with increased risk of developing active tuberculosis, but the exact gene(s) responsible for this effect was not identified.

Flores-Villanueva and colleagues show that the culprit behind the increased susceptibility to TB was a small change in the gene that encodes a protein called MCP-1 (the MCP-1 gene resides of chromosome 17). The genetic change was a tiny one, with the DNA sequence differing by only a single nucleotide (the building blocks of DNA). This change, which resulted in increased production of the MCP-1 protein, was five times more prevalent in individuals with active TB than in those who were infected but remained healthy.

MCP-1 is a protein that helps attract immune cells to sites of infection. For this reason, this protein is important during the early immune response to TB-causing bacteria. But extremely high levels of MCP-1 can be dangerous, as they inhibit the production of another immune protein called interleukin-12. Interleukin-12 is required to activate the immune cells that fight off the infectio n once they arrive on the scene. In an accompanying commentary article, geneticists Alexandre Alcais, Jean-Laurent Casanova and their colleagues at the University of Paris note that this is the largest genetic impact on adult TB that has ever been described.


Source:Journal of Experimental Medicine

Related biology news :

1. Sexual cooperation: Mating increases longevity in ant queens
2. Global warming increases oyster sensitivity to pollution
3. Prenatal exposure to famine increases risk of schizophrenia
4. Male rivalry increases when females at most fertile, say researchers
5. Lack of a key enzyme dramatically increases resistance to sepsis
6. Variation in bitter-taste receptor gene increases risk for alcoholism
7. Gene variation increases SIDS risk in African Americans
8. Single cell amoeba increases MRSA numbers 1000- fold
9. Mosquito spray increases toxicity of pyrethroids in creek, study finds
10. Tropical forest CO2 emissions tied to nutrient increases
11. Pak1 expression increases tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/18/2015)... --> --> ... report titled  Gesture Recognition Market - Global Industry Analysis, ... to the report, the global gesture recognition market was valued at ... US$29.1 bn by 2021, at a CAGR of 20.3% ... dominated the global gesture recognition market in ...
(Date:11/17/2015)... Nov. 17, 2015  Vigilant Solutions announces today that ... Board of Directors. --> ... retiring from the partnership at TPG Capital, one of ... over $140 Billion in revenue.  He founded and led ... the TPG companies, from 1997 to 2013.  In his ...
(Date:11/12/2015)... BOSTON , Nov. 12, 2015  A golden ... for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has provided a new ... Boston Children,s Hospital, the Broad Institute of MIT and ... Brazil . Cell, ... some dogs "escape" the disease,s effects. The Boston Children,s ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... Harry Lander , President of Regen, expands his role to ... and recruits five distinguished scientists to join advisory ... expands his role to include serving as ... scientists to join advisory team --> Dr. Harry Lander ... serving as Chief Science Officer and ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Global Stem Cells Group Chile ... Central America and abroad for the first Iberoamerican Convention on Aesthetic Medicine, Cosmetology ... Testart will present and discuss new trends in anti-aging stem cell treatments, regenerative ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015  An interventional radiology technique shows promise for helping ... of a study being presented today at the annual meeting ... (RSNA). --> --> ... interventional radiologists as a way to stop bleeding in emergency ... means of treating obesity is new. Mubin Syed ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... HOLLISTON, Mass. , Nov. 30, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... HART ), a biotechnology company developing bioengineered ... has received written notification from The NASDAQ Stock ... minimum bid price requirements. The letter noted that ... of HART,s common stock having exceeded $1.00 per ...
Breaking Biology Technology: