Navigation Links
Gene expression patterns predict rapid decline in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease typically characterized by the slow but progressive onset of shortness of breath or cough. Most patients live about five years after diagnosis. However, according to a new study being published today in the online journal PLoS ONE, a subset of patients with a specific genetic profile has a much more rapid progression to complete pulmonary failure and death without a lung transplant.

Based on observations in the clinic that some IPF patients display a more rapidly progressing disease course, researchers at the Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Disease at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, collaborating with pulmonary scientists in Mexico and California, used DNA microarray analysis to measure the gene expression patterns of 26 rapid progressors and 88 slow progressors. They identified 437 differentially expressed genes between the groups. Specifically, lungs of rapid progressors, who were predominantly males who smoked, overexpressed genes involved in the development of tissues and organs (morphogenesis), oxidative stress, cell migration and proliferation and genes from fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells.

According to Naftali Kaminski, M.D., director of the Simmons Center and director of the Lung Translational Genomics Center, division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, these findings offer strong evidence that rapid progressors represent a distinct clinical phenotype compared with the usual slower progressing patients.

"We are only now starting to really understand IPF and to characterize it," Dr. Kaminski said. "Therefore, it is critical for patients with the disease to be seen in centers that are actively involved in IPF research, so we can help them better decide a course of action."

These findings also highlight the variability in the progression and outcome of IPF and may explain, in part, the difficulty in obtaining significant and reproducible results in studies of therapeutic interventions in patients with IPF, noted first author Moisés Selman, M.D., director of research at the National Institute of Respiratory Research in Mexico City. "This study suggests that physicians should pay more attention to the time of onset of symptoms in their patients," Dr. Selman said.

"Although preliminary, these results may allow investigators to identify biomarkers of disease progression and, more importantly, better evaluate the effectiveness of potential therapies," added Talmadge E. King Jr., M.D., chief of medicine at San Francisco General Hospital and an internationally renowned expert in research and management of pulmonary fibrosis.
'"/>

Source:University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences


Related biology news :

1. Alcohols effects on gene expression in the central nervous system
2. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop tool that uses MRI to visualize gene expression in living animals
3. Towards precise classification of cancers based on robust gene functional expression profiles
4. Expression Project for Oncology (expO) completes first phase of standardized gene expression analyses
5. Study: homemade gene expression technology unreliable
6. Cooperation is key—a new way of looking at MicroRNA and how it controls gene expression
7. Agilent Technologies releases probe sequence, annotation information for all its commercial gene expression microarrays
8. Multiple-drug resistant gene expression pattern predicts treatment outcome for pediatric leukemia
9. Computational verification of protein-protein interactions by orthologous co-expression
10. Random gene expression may drive HIV into hiding
11. Confirmation of human protein interaction data by human expression data

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/3/2017)... 3, 2017  Data captured by IsoCode, ... detected a statistically significant association between the ... treatment and objective response of cancer patients ... predict whether cancer patients will respond to ... well as to improve both pre-infusion potency testing ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities and forecast ... behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, ... others), by end use industry (government and law enforcement, ... and banking, and others), and by region ( ... Asia Pacific , and the Rest ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... , March 27, 2017  Catholic Health ... and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving ... Adoption Model sm . In addition, CHS previously ... U.S. hospitals using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... its high level of EMR usage in an ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... in its endogenous context, enabling overexpression experiments and avoiding the use of exogenous ... RNA guides is transformative for performing systematic gain-of-function studies. , This complement ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... will be hosting a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ... digital pathology adoption best practices and how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the ... million people each year. Especially those living in larger cities are affected by air ... one of the most pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take action. , “I ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... ... San Diego-based team building and cooking events company, Lajollacooks4u, has unveiled a ... new look is part of a transformation to increase awareness, appeal to new markets ... It will also expand its service offering from its signature gourmet cooking classes and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: