Navigation Links
For some young fish, early gene expression is a clear harbinger of fated lifestyle

As juveniles, individuals of many fish species face a developmental choice that will profoundly affect their future: whether to adopt a sedentary or migratory lifestyle.

Sedentary (or "residential") individuals remain in the region of their birth, while their migratory compatriots set forth on long open-water journeys. The developmental choice of the residential versus migratory "life history" is known to be influenced by environmental factors, but is not well understood at the genetic level. Researchers now report that fish that are very closely related genetically show dramatically different patterns of actual gene expression if they have adopted different lifestyle fates. Moreover, and perhaps more surprisingly, less-related individuals from geographically different populations nonetheless exhibit very similar patterns of gene expression if they have adopted the same fate--residential or migratory. Thus, the researchers found that levels of expression of a great many genes depend primarily on an individual's future lifestyle.

The findings, which illuminate how programs of gene expression have evolved to control profoundly different developmental outcomes, are reported in the April 18th issue of Current Biology by Drs. Thomas Giger, Carlo Largiadèr, and Laurent Excoffier of the University of Bern, along with colleagues from France, Ireland, Denmark, and the UK.

Salmonid fish, which include trout and whitefish as well as salmon, show exceptional levels of life-history variation--that is, residential and migratory types often co-occur within a single population of young fish. Before reaching sexual maturity and leaving their natal stream, migratory individuals undergo dramatic morphological, physiological, and behavioral changes that prepare them for adulthood in open fresh and salty waters.

In their innovative work, which is based on studying the gene expression profiles of hundreds of genes at a time in different fish populations, t he researchers studied gene expression in two species--strains of the brown trout, Salmo trutta, and a strain of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. The researchers showed that many genes of genetically similar sedentary and migrant populations living in the same river were expressed at different levels. At the same time, two sedentary brown trout populations from Denmark and France, despite having diverged half a million years ago, showed very similar gene expression profiles. This remarkable similarity in gene expression between populations sharing the same life history--but being genetically very divergent and occupying different habitats--suggests that the genetic program of a given life history has been a highly selected attribute during the evolution of brown trout populations.

The findings also indicate that such striking differences in gene expression profiles are probably controlled by only a few major genes.

In addition, the authors showed that while there is a large diversity in gene expression levels between individuals from the same population, the different expression profiles associated with lifestyle fates were so distinct that by measuring the expression levels of relevant genes, it was possible to predict the future lifestyle of fish at the juvenile stage.


'"/>

Source:Cell Press


Related biology news :

1. Live fast, die young true for forests too
2. High rates of sexually transmitted infections found in young drug users
3. Sharp older brains are not the same as younger brains
4. Thinner and younger
5. Even fish dont swim well when theyre young!
6. Life and death in the hippocampus: what young neurons need to survive
7. Wild meerkats school their young
8. PET imaging shows young smokers quick benefit of quitting
9. In young mice, gregariousness seems to reside in the genes
10. Agilent Technologies introduces advanced zebrafish, mouse microarrays for stem cell and developmental biology research
11. Sudden change in social status triggers genetic response in male fish, study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/14/2016)... Nov. 14, 2016  Based on its ... Frost & Sullivan recognizes FST Biometrics with ... for Visionary Innovation Leadership. FST Biometrics emerged ... identification market by pioneering In Motion Identification ... instant, seamless, and non-invasive verification. This patented ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... WASHINGTON , June 22, 2016 On ... highly-anticipated call to industry to share solutions for the ... by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), explains that ... nationals are departing the United States ... criminals, and to defeat imposters. Logo - ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... New York , June 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a new market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by ... and Forecast, 2016 - 2024". According to the report, ... USD 11.60 billion in 2015 and is estimated ... reach USD 48.56 billion by 2024.  ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... Texas , Dec. 7, 2016  Genprex, ... of revolutionary immunogene therapy treatments, today announced that ... practice within a leading strategic communications and advisory ... communications program. The program will combine investor relations, ... objective of raising the profile of Genprex and ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... and Azusa, CA (PRWEB) , ... December 07, ... ... of distributed wastewater treatment and resource recovery solutions for industrial facilities, today announced ... , will be the first to use Cambrian’s novel water-energy purchase agreement (WEPA). ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... Massachusetts (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... Kara Dwyer Dodge grew up hearing ... Dwyer, a third-generation fisherman in Scituate, Mass., found a sea turtle entangled in the lines ... where the turtle became a minor sensation because no one could remember ever seeing one ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... The Osteoarthritis ... the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to consider OA as a serious disease. As ... about the growing population of OA patients, many of whom may experience progressive ...
Breaking Biology Technology: