Navigation Links
Drug-resistant bacteria patterns in intensive care units changing nationally

A dangerous drug-resistant bacterium is becoming more prevalent in many intensive care units, according to an article in the Feb. 1 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, now available online.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for a variety of infections that patients often acquire in the hospital. Skin infections are the most common, but MRSA can also infect the heart, the lungs, and the digestive tract. The emergence of MRSA and other drug-resistant bacteria may be due in part to over-prescribing and overuse of antibiotics.

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined MRSA data from more than 1,200 intensive care units (ICUs) from 1992 to 2003. They found that in 1992, 36 percent of S. aureus isolates were drug-resistant; but in 2003, 64 percent of isolates were MRSA, an increase of about 3 percentage points per year.

Despite the increase in MRSA prevalence, there was also a decrease in MRSA that was resistant to multiple drugs. The researchers hypothesize that the influx of MRSA strains from the community might have replaced those multidrug-resistant strains associated with the hospital.

"Unlike traditional MRSA the community strain is very fit - it causes infection in healthy people," said CDC epidemiologist Dr. Monina Klevens. "When it is introduced into a hospital, where ill patients are more vulnerable to infection, it has the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality."

Due to community MRSA's ability to infect the young and healthy, traditional risk factors for identifying hospital-associated MRSA colonization, such as dialysis and prior hospitalization, are not effective predictors of whether a person is carrying the community strain.

"Lines are blurring as far as risk factors are concerned," Dr. Klevens said.

The study summarized MRSA data at the national level, indicating general trends, but physicians need to know what is hap pening in their specific locations to help control the spread of infection.

"We know that the prevalence of community MRSA varies widely in local geographic areas, so it is important that doctors be aware of what is happening in their community," Dr. Klevens said.


'"/>

Source:Infectious Diseases Society of America


Related biology news :

1. NYCs First Rapid HIV Drug-resistant AIDS Case Prompts Call to Step Up HIV Prevention
2. Drug-resistant bacteria on poultry products differ by brand
3. Drug-resistant bacterial infections serious complication after corrective eye surgery
4. Anti-bacterial additive widespread in U.S. waterways
5. A bacterial genome reveals new targets to combat infectious disease
6. Discovery of key proteins shape could lead to improved bacterial pneumonia vaccine
7. Scientists discover that host cell lipids facilitate bacterial movement
8. Family trees of ancient bacteria reveal evolutionary moves
9. Programmable cells: Engineer turns bacteria into living computers
10. NASA links nanobacteria to kidney stones and other diseases
11. Substance protects resilient staph bacteria
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2016)... , UAE, April 20, 2016 ... be implemented as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution ... the biometric fingerprint reader or the door interface with ... of modern access control systems. The minimal dimensions of ... ID readers into the building installations offer considerable freedom ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... 14, 2016 BioCatch ™, ... today announced the appointment of Eyal Goldwerger ... Goldwerger,s leadership appointment comes at a time ... the deployment of its platform at several of the ... which discerns unique cognitive and physiological factors, is a ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... March 31, 2016  Genomics firm Nabsys has completed ... Barrett Bready , M.D., who returned to the ... original technical leadership team, including Chief Technology Officer, ... Development, Steve Nurnberg and Vice President of Software and ... company. Dr. Bready served as CEO of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical ... novel compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, ... been granted Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. ... of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. ... designed to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is pleased to announce 24 new Young ... cancer. Members of the Class of 2016 were selected from a pool of ... More About the Class of 2016 PCF Young Investigators ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , ... June 23, 2016 , ... In a new ... in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated for breast ... results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side effect of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... ClinCapture, the only free validated electronic ... showcase its product’s latest features from June 26 to June 30, 2016 for ... Disrupting Clinical Trials in The Cloud during the conference. DIA (Drug Information ...
Breaking Biology Technology: