Navigation Links
Computer models aid understanding of antibody-dependent enhancement in spread of dengue fever

Evolutionary trade-off exists between advantage and disadvantage

Some viruses' ability to exploit the human body's own defenses to increase their replication may be both a blessing and curse, according to the findings of a study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The process is known as antibody-dependent enhancement. Scientists believe antibody-dependent enhancement may allow the dengue virus to grow more rapidly in people who were previously infected and have partial but incomplete immunity to the virus. Enhanced virus replication triggers a more deadly, hemorrhagic form of the disease.

A study published in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that antibody-dependent enhancement offers an evolutionary trade-off between advantage and disadvantage for the dengue virus. The findings could one day lead to new strategies for developing and deploying vaccines.

Using computational models based on epidemic theory, the researchers examined the dynamic role antibody-dependent enhancement plays in the spread of dengue viruses. They concluded that when antibody-dependent enhancement triggered small increases in transmission it gave viruses an edge over other co-circulating dengue viruses that did not experience enhancement. Counter-intuitively, larger increases in transmission resulted in more extinctions of the enhanced virus.

"Dengue dynamics are similar to predator-prey systems in ecology. Antibody-dependent enhancement makes a virus a better predator. But there comes a point where the predator gets so good it runs out of prey," explained lead author Derek Cummings, a research associate in the Department of International Health at the Bloomberg School. "We found that antibody-dependent enhancement helps the dengue virus spread faster, but there are limits to how much the virus can exploit this strategy."

According to the computer simulations, anti body-dependent enhancement creates oscillations, or "booms and busts" in the incidence of dengue virus infections. Enhancement results in larger booms, but also deeper troughs in incidence, which lead to extinction. Although the computer models were specifically developed for dengue, the researchers believe the results could apply to any disease in which partial immunity increases pathogen replication rates.

"Experimental dengue vaccines will soon be entering into large-scale clinical trials. We must understand the processes that affect transmission--such as antibody-dependent enhancement--to design optimal dengue vaccination strategies," said Donald S. Burke, MD, senior author of the study and professor in the Department of International Health at the Bloomberg School.

"Dynamic effects of antibody-dependent enhancement on the fitness of viruses" was written by Derek A. T. Cummings, Ira B. Schwartz, Lora Billings, Leah B. Shaw and Donald S. Burke. Cummings and Burke are with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Schwartz and Shaw are with the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., and Billings is with Montclair State University.


'"/>

Source:Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health


Related biology news :

1. Computers to be used to find blueprint for new influenza drug
2. Large-scale Computer Simulations Reveal New Insights Into Antibiotic Resistance
3. Computers close in on protein structure prediction
4. Computer modeling reveals hidden conversations within cells
5. Computer-chemistry yields new insight into a puzzle of cell division
6. Computers to save unique type of American red squirrel
7. Computer simulation hints at new HIV drug target
8. Computer scientist sorts out confusable drug names
9. Computer-based games enhance mental function in patients with Alzheimers
10. Computer scientists unravel language of surgery
11. Computer with brain connections changing quality of life of paralyzed
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... report to their offering. ... global eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% ... Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market ... landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... SEATTLE , April 5, 2017  The Allen ... the Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic ... large-scale 3D imaging data, the first application of deep ... edited human stem cell lines and a growing suite ... the platform for these and future publicly available resources ...
(Date:4/3/2017)... 3, 2017  Data captured by IsoCode, ... detected a statistically significant association between the ... treatment and objective response of cancer patients ... predict whether cancer patients will respond to ... well as to improve both pre-infusion potency testing ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2017)... RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. , April 27, 2017 ... ) today announced that its Board of Directors authorized ... company,s common stock. This program will became effective immediately, ... may be made in the open market, accelerated share ... time as determined by United Therapeutics, management and in ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... Arrowhead Publishers is pleased ... is coming to San Diego, CA on September 27-28, 2017. Leaders from the ... latest advances in the treatment of various types of pain. There are also ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... The Council for Agricultural ... to Jayson Lusk, a consummate communicator who promotes agricultural science and technology in ... as he explains how innovation and growth in agriculture are critical for food ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... Alto, CA, USA (PRWEB) , ... April 26, ... ... popular seminar on FDA’s GMP expectations for phase I clinical trials comes to ... attended by various biotechnology and pharma professionals representing FDA regulated organizations such as ...
Breaking Biology Technology: