Navigation Links
Chemical warfare agent detection technology used to treat lung disease

A new technique based on the same technology used to detect chemical warfare agents and explosives is being employed by scientists at The University of Manchester to treat hospital patients with lung disease.

Dr Paul Thomas and a team of researchers are using a sensor, commonly used to detect explosives at airports, to develop a new way of diagnosing lung disease.

The microDMxTM sensor, developed by Sionex Corporation, is being used to develop a new technique which is able to detect 'unhealthy' molecules present in the breath of a patient.

The technology is currently being tested at Wythenshawe Hospital's North West Lung Research Centre (NWLRC). The aim is to produce a device which will enable doctors to monitor patients with lung or respiratory conditions by simply asking them to breathe into it.

The microDMxTM sensor is based on a Differential Mobility Spectrometer (DMS) and is a significant advance over the current Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) systems which are currently deployed in airports to detect minute traces of explosives or drugs. The microDMx sensor is able to identify molecules that may be the cause of lung diseases such as cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease caused by smoking.

Dr Paul Thomas from the University's School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, who is leading the research, said: "Our vision is that one day we will be able to detect a previously undetectable tumour metabolising inside a human lung simply by asking a patient to breathe into a device like this. For now our aim to use the microDMx sensor to develop better instruments which will improve patient care and treatment.

"The potential is such that we will not only be able to provide more accurate diagnosis, but we will also be able to tailor treatments to the individual. For instance, if a patient is taking steroids for asthma, we would be able determine whether they were b eing given the right amount of steroids from the molecules in their breath which relate to the severity of the inflammation in their lungs."

NWLRC Consultant Dr Dave Singh, said: "This research could make dramatic improvements to the detection of lung diseases. We are really excited about the future possibilities for diagnosing diseases, and monitoring the response to treatment."

The microDMx sensor can be used to detect and analyse a broad spectrum of molecules associated with different conditions with extreme sensitivity. It can also be configured to block out molecules produced by common ailments such as sore throats or chesty coughs which may interfere with the accuracy of data.

"What is unique about this sensor, and the use of the microDMx technology, is the fact that it can be configured to not just analyse one disease or condition, but it has the potential to be used to analyse a broad spectrum of conditions from asthma, to cancer and metabolic disorders such as diabetes," says Dr Thomas.

Dr Thomas' research will form part of a new National Initiative in Ion Mobility Spectrometry (NIIMS), which aims to explore the use of IMS measurement within the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields. Alongside Professor Colin Creaser from Nottingham Trent University he will lead a consortium of experts and industrial partners, who will be evaluating DMS and IMS potential in areas such as high-speed separations of complex mixtures and structural characterisation of pharmaceuticals and biomolecules.


'"/>

Source:University of Manchester


Related biology news :

1. Chemicals in tattoo inks need closer scrutiny
2. Roots Engage in Underground Chemical Warfare
3. Chemical Engineer Kao Explores Antibiotic Synthesis With DNA Chips
4. Chemical band-aid prevents heart failure in mice with muscular dystrophy
5. Chemical compound inhibits tumor growth, size in new mouse study
6. T-rays: New imaging technology spotlighted by American Chemical Society
7. Chemical guidance of T cells leads to immunologic memory and long-term immunity
8. Chemical signaling helps regulate sensory map formation in the brain
9. Chemical in many air fresheners may reduce lung function
10. Chemical tests of cell growth enter third dimension
11. Chemicals in brown algae may protect against skin cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/26/2020)... ... ... Modality Solutions, a biopharmaceutical cold chain validation engineering firm, is pleased to ... most prestigious ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies. Modality Solutions made the Inc. ... growth of 71 percent. , The Inc. 5000 list represents a unique look ...
(Date:8/21/2020)... ... August 19, 2020 , ... The 19th Annual Bio-IT ... data science, informatics and IT leaders goes VIRTUAL and announces its updated event ... change, Bio-IT takes the leadership role of keeping our life science community connected ...
(Date:8/7/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... August 06, 2020 , ... ... sciences industry, is pleased to announce that Eric Chen and Jessica Wong have ... of Product Management & Strategy, respectively. , Eric Chen heads development efforts for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/12/2020)... ... August 12, 2020 , ... ... (EMMA International), a global leader in FDA compliance consulting has been named on ... private companies. The list represents a unique look at the most successful companies ...
(Date:8/3/2020)... ... August 03, 2020 , ... Introducing Ardent Animal Health – MediVet ... , Known as MediVet Biologics since its formation in 2016, the ... new Ardent Animal Health will build on its base of innovative therapies for osteoarthritis ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... BEDFORD, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... July 29, 2020 ... ... of highly reliable, solid-state radar transmitter systems that can be configured to drive ... a single controller that can drive one or two switches in a push-pull ...
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... ... eSource has long been touted as the solution to high data management ... reasons it did not take off as quickly as people initially expected, and where ... towards capturing data electronically for clinical trials and then repurposing it for downstream analysis, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: