Navigation Links
Can't serve an ace? Could be muscle fatigue

Fatigue could reduce skills and cause injuries and muscle weakness during sport because the brain does not consider the extra effort required for movement, Monash University researchers have found.

Professor Uwe Proske, from Monash's Department of Physiology, found when muscles were weakened from overuse or fatigue, limb control was affected, particularly if the person couldn't see their limbs.

The study, which has been published in the Journal of Physiology, showed muscles needed to work harder to compensate for fatigue, which led to uncertainty about where the limb was.

"In the absence of sight, people judge the position of their limbs based on the amount of effort required to lift them against the force of gravity," Professor Proske said. "Take gravity away, as happens to astronauts, and they have real trouble carrying out skilled movements.

"In our experiments we found that when the muscles in one arm were fatigued, the effort required to maintain a set arm position was much greater. When asked to keep both arms in a similar position, where one arm was fatigued and the other was not, the arms did not align.

"That was unexpected. Previously it was believed that fatigue had nothing to do with the body's sense of position," he said.

Professor Proske said the findings could have implications for sports that required skilled actions such as serving a tennis ball, throwing a javelin or shooting a bow and arrow.

He said it could also result in loss of control over stride length during running - leading to stretched hamstrings and other injuries.

"When a tennis player is serving, they don't watch where their shoulders are, they rely on the brain's knowledge of how much effort is required to maintain the best position, to get the ball where it needs to go.

"However, if the limbs are fatigued the brain must activate them harder and this leads to errors about where the different body parts are located."

Professor Proske said the research could also offer insight into the symptoms of some motor system diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The abnormal movements were likely to relate, in part, to a disturbed sense of effort, he said.


'"/>

Source:Research Australia


Related biology news :

1. Examination of internal wiring of yeast, worm, and fly reveals conserved circuits
2. Conserved amino acids play both structural and mechanistic roles in sandwich-like protein
3. Scientists observe how a close bond activates the immune system
4. Primates harvest bee nests in Ugandan reserve
5. Satellites show Amazon parks, indigenous reserves stop forest clearing
6. How marine reserves are giving coral reefs a helping hand
7. Ancient fossil DNA found preserved in crystal
8. Case Western Reserve University researchers find protein associated with brain cell death
9. Recombination protein dynamics observed with single monomer resolution
10. Seals protect brain, conserve oxygen by turning off shivering response on icy dives
11. When smell cells fail they call in stem cell reserves
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/14/2019)... ... ... Personalized Stem Cells, Inc (“PSC”), a human adipose-derived stem cell company, ... stem cell treatment of knee osteoarthritis . The first treatment came shortly after the ... , In July of 2019, PSC received FDA approval for a New ...
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... 12, 2019 , ... Atlantic Ultraviolet Corporation (AUV), the premier ... voted their patented automatic and manual wipers the #1 best feature of the ... maintenance task required of an ultraviolet water purifier is quartz sleeve cleaning. A ...
(Date:11/6/2019)... , ... November 06, 2019 , ... ... Donald Stanski, MD, a senior pharmaceutical industry executive with expertise in clinical pharmacology ... for drug and disease strategic data analytics, has joined the firm as an ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/6/2019)... ... November 06, 2019 , ... Diversified Technologies, Inc. has introduced a ... per hour to improve processing. , The DTI Industrial PEF Unit can pre-treat whole ... increase juice yields by up to 50% and achieve up to an 80% reduction ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... ... October 31, 2019 , ... A clinical trial usually involves ... study managers, principal investigators, supply chain managers, manufacturers, IRT, CRAs and so on. ... the latest data, potentially leading to patient risk. , By having a single ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... October 28, 2019 , ... CaroGen ... Board: , , Professor Jack R Wands, MD, of Brown ... Wyeth (Pfizer) , Professor Gil Mor, MD, PhD, of Wayne State University, ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ... , ... Catalent, a global leader in clinical supply services, today announced that ... in a panel session titled “Cell and Gene Therapy Logistics” at the upcoming Health ... on Oct. 28-30, 2019. , The panel session, on Wednesday, Oct. 30 at 8:30 ...
Breaking Biology Technology: